I like Match

More music selling, sharing madness is upon us with Google Music and iTunes Match. A few months ago I started using Spotify. Here’s what I briefly am feeling now on overall topic. I’m still discovering most of my music via YouTube. I like obscur 80s electronic releases and even better the occasional rare demo tapes. If I find some new lost or interesting song on YouTube Google’s great search engine groups related videos in the sidebar. I’ve found over 100 songs that way in just a couple of months. Some of the songs I find on iTunes and then buy. Some will never be for sale anywhere. For example, a 1981 demo cassette uploaded in Italy with only 2 YouTube views. I “save” those songs audio and add it to my iTunes library. Apple fanboyism aside iTunes Match is incredible for my use case. It now takes all my purchased songs and obscur finds and let’s me have them everywhere. I thought I would use Spotify more but my friends who I follow aren’t listening to anything I really want to hear. The few Spotify playlist websites aren’t full of playlists that interest me. It’s an amazing service but I haven’t clicked with it yet. I’m not giving up on it yet though. I live in Gmail and Google docs all day. I’m trying to like Google+ but although I post things there my engagement seems low. The best thing about Google music will be it’s Google+ integration. Of course if Google+ doesn’t keep my interest then that’s out the window. As a musician I wonder what the cut will be for Indies on G+?

“If you want the benefits of iTunes in the Cloud for music you haven’t purchased from iTunes, iTunes Match is the perfect solution. It’s built right into the iTunes app on your Mac or PC and the Music app on your iOS devices. And it lets you store your entire collection, including music you’ve imported from CDs or purchased somewhere other than iTunes. For just $24.99 a year.” – Apple.com

Oliver’s Early Electronic Playlist on Youtube: click here

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on November 17, 2011 at 4:59 am, filed under business, music and tagged , , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Oliver’s Early Electronic

As record stores disappeared and cassettes disintegrated we lost access to some obscur electronic music from the early 80s. You can find tidbits on iTunes, Spotify and assorted blogs. Youtube on the other hand has become a treasure trove of underground material. Not only is a large portion of early recorded material being uploaded but it seems anyone that had a local electronic band is posting their demos. I’ve started a playlist of my findings. So far I have 35 videos in the playlist that runs over two hours. Of course there is a huge amount more that can be added. Feel free to post links of songs you think I should include. The more tape hiss the better!

“The domain name www.youtube.com was activated on February 14, 2005, and the website was developed over the subsequent months.” – Wikipedia.org

For more info: youtube.com/user/thingstocomerecords

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on September 7, 2011 at 4:32 am, filed under music and tagged , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Redesigned YouTube Channel

About a month ago I wrote a post titled Post All Your Music in Full on YouTube (link). Well, I practice what I preach and have uploaded my new album Joyless Pleasure in it’s entirety. I also took the oppurtunity to refresh the look of the page. I added a 1600 pixel wide “Horrorist” logo wallpaper that shades to beige when you scroll down a bit. I also spent time tweaking the colors of the Channel to match the album’s look. I have no doubt uploading the songs in full is a good decision and I already see the view counts rising quickly. I also made a the embedable Joyless Pleasure playlist you see above. Big thanks to my graphic designer Maurice Roy for creating stills for each of the songs.

“When it comes to theme and module editing, users with no CSS or design experience will find themselves completely at ease with beautifying their channel design. The themes and colors are pretty self-explanatory, so you can pick a preset theme, start toying with colors, and get an as-it-happens preview while you tweak. You can still upload a custom background image and adjust the coloring for every element of your channel. Once you’re done, just click save to publish the new design publicly.” – mashable.com

For more info: youtube.com/thingstocomerecords

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on May 22, 2011 at 3:45 pm, filed under promotion, video and tagged , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Post all your music in full on YouTube

Yesterday’s post where I asked the question if your a musician should you fight piracy was very interesting. Most people agreed with my first inclination that you want the most fans no matter what the means. Therefore today I ask: Should musicians post all their music; full length songs on YouTube? Here’s my reasoning. Over time fans are going to post your full songs on YouTube. If you have a music video they will repost that. If you don’t have an official video they will just put the song up with some text or often they will get creative and have a slideshow of photos of you or something similar. Why not beat them to the punch this way you control the video? If you control it you can at least add links to buy your tunes somewhere legal. You can have your own annotated links, images, etc… If the song is a hit you could even make some money with Google AdSense. I’ve attached two examples to this post. The first one for my song One Night in NYC. It has over 800,000 views but I wasn’t the one who uploaded the the video. I certainly wish I did so. Maybe I can claim it somehow without it loosing it’s view count? The second example is for a song I recorded “Soul of Emptiness”. Someone just played the record and displayed the lyrics. I think most fans know the YouTube audio quality is cassette-ish so if they love the song they still seek out a better version to own. What do you think? Upload each song in full to YouTube starting on day one?

“Join the largest worldwide video-sharing community!” – youtube.com

For more info: youtube.com/thingstocomerecords

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on April 21, 2011 at 2:39 am, filed under promotion and tagged . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Five pro-audio video sites with original content.

Gone are the days when were starved to find any video (television) showing a synth or mixing console in action. YouTube and the myriad of other sharing sites such as Vimeo and Blip.tv are flooded with pro and amateur studio clips. By the way, if you were not following this blog last November be sure to read my post, “Make a super YouTube synthesizer channel“. It’s also worth noting that most companies these days have their own video channels on YouTube. Here’s a few: Ableton, Propellerhead Software, Curious Inventor and Moog.

Now did you know that there are a bunch of sites producing their own original content usually not found on YouTube?

Mix. I never bothered subscribing to Mix Magazine but it I flipped though hundreds of issues while drinking coffee at Barnes & Nobles. On their video page they have gear reviews, engineer videos and go backstage at concerts to get behind the scenes with the tech guys. Right now what’s up? Cakewalk SONAR 8, Mix Sound for Film Feature “Iron Man”, Interview: Producer Michael Wagener, Backstage With Mike Fechner. Good stuff no? link

Keyboardmag.tv. Keyboard was the first magazine I ever subscribed to. Suny Purchase in Westchester, NY has every single issue bound in yearly archives at their library. I remember spending hours looking a the original advertisements for Roland TB-303s and ARPs. Their “TV channel” has sections for lessons, artists, events and yep… gear reviews. What’s on this week? Miles Davis Gig, Sampling Tutorial, QNA; Reason 4.0 and Subtle Dynamics. link

EQmag.tv. EQ is the same crew as Keyboard but for the rest of the studio. They have a similar type of online TV “station”. What will you find on it today? Diffusing/Absorbing, Studio Ethics (I have to watch this one!), Fighting Phasing, Processing & Tracking. Are you even still reading Wire to the Ear? Good videos! link

Recordproduction.com. I’m just going to quote them: “Watch 158 leading record producers & recording engineers talking on camera!”. Yes indeed see what people making real hits have to say. Don’t rely on what some 14 year old is staying over at KVR! See producers such as: Simon Humphrey, Ken Scott, Trevor Horn, Andy Gill. It’s getting hard for me to finish this post… must. stop. watching. videos. link

IHR TV. These guys from Canada have heart. They started out as a podcast and now have been adding video slowly into the mix. It’s a bit beginner for me but there is always something new to learn. Earlier this year one of the guys fought cancer and did some podcasts from his hospital bed. Respect. So far they only have four videos up but let’s head over and give them some views. They deserve it. So what’s on tonight? Using Midi Drums, Podcast Audio Production and how to Rewire Pro-Tools and Logic. By they way they are always giving stuff away. link

The honorable mention goes to tv.sonicstate.com. It’s mostly user generated but you may not know about it. Did you?

If you know of some other cool places to get pro-audio vids let me know in the comments.

photo credits: Roo Reynolds and erikadotnet

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on October 16, 2008 at 3:13 am, filed under video and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Put your music video everywhere with Tubemogul.

We all know that having a few music videos per album is great promotion. With inexpensive tools like iMovie and a Flip video camera there is no excuse for not producing them. Once your video is all finished you uploaded it to YouTube and MySpace and your done. But wait what about that gorgeous video site Vimeo? Or that site let lets viewers comment along the playback timeline… Viddler? You know having your video in Blip.tv is also cool because they offer an embeddable show player. Hmm it’s going to be a long day uploading the same video to all these sites. But alas there is a better way: Tubemogul.

Tubemogul is an incredible free service to which you upload your video to one time and they distribute it to over 20 sites. That distribution service alone is truly a gift from the time saving gods however they give you more goodies. Once your video or videos are uploaded and delivered around the web universe and a few days go by log back into your Tubemogul account and viola you can see Analytics. Analytics is the fancy word for “Who is watching, how many are watching and where are they watching.”. The data is presented to you with nice interactive charts and graphs.

You may end up surprised that YouTube is not getting you the most views. Remember your video on YouTube is lost in a huge ocean of content. Earlier this year I discovered videos from a music blogger named Vergel Evans in his studio via Viddler. I got to his video because I searched “drum machine” and because Viddler is low on content like music tech his LX7.ca videos show popped up.

Don’t worry if you already have your videos on a few sites already because you can still upload them to Tubemogul and deselect “distribute” to those you already have covered.

Be sure to check out Tubemogul’s video channel on YouTube which is full of usefull tutorial videos: click here

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on October 1, 2008 at 2:11 am, filed under promotion, video and tagged , , , , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



TapeDeck sends audio direct to YouTube.

Here an interesting new application for Mac OS-X called TapeDeck. It’s an audio recorder that looks like an old Radio Shack cassette deck. You can label your recordings cassettes with notes that look handwritten.

Your archived recordings are displayed in virtual cassette cases. All of this is pretty ridiculous except one feature could be very useful: Upload to YouTube.

Upload to YouTube sends your audio to YouTube and the video diplays your Cassette, the labeling your put on it and a little animation so you know it’s playing:

For more info tapedeckapp.com

Related post: Cassette tape nostalgia. Rewind.

via TUAW

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on August 16, 2008 at 3:35 am, filed under video and tagged , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.