Auria iPad

At 32 seconds in see PSP Audioware’s custom channel strip and at 47 seconds in see a Fabfilter “VST” plug-in. When we get an iPad Pro which is 2-3x the size, speed and a retina display I’m in… for now full on DAW, mixing, etc… on a small underpowered screen is a novelty.

“With the ability to play 48 mono or stereo 24bit/44.1 kHz tracks simultaneously, record up to 24 of those tracks simultaneously (through any supported USB multichannel audio interface), and edit and mix with familiar tools and full parameter automation, it’s clear Auria sets a new standard for iPad multitracking.

What’s more, Auria’s 64-bit Double Precision architecture ensures ample headroom for plug-in processing and mix summing, transforming your iPad into a recording and mixing system with sound quality that rivals most DAWs.

The depth is in the details. Like customizable pan laws. Like meters that are selectable between VU and RMS. Like full delay compensation for all tracks, including aux sends and subgroups. Complete with a vintage-inspired channel strip on every channel, a dedicated master channel strip, VST plug-ins engineered by renowned makers such as PSPaudioware, Overloud, Fab Filter and Drumagog, and support for Dropbox, Soundcloud, AAF, and MP3, Auria truly raises the bar for recording and mixing on the iPad.”

For more info: auriaapp.com

Xfer Nerve


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gxbx-fvvsGI

There are similar products to Xfer’s Nerve yet I am still interested. Mac/PC VST/AU. $199. What do you think? Is there something unique to Nerve that should be mentioned?

“Nerve is a software drum machine which brings powerful beat creation and manipulation to your Host Sequencer. Nerve runs as a VSTi or AudioUnit plugin. Nerve was designed and coded by veteran dance music producers, with a diverse sample library included from many of todays top sound designers. Create your own beats entirely from scratch using sounds you already have (AIF/WAV/REX/RX2/AKAI .SND), or utilize the factory-included Drum Kits, Presets, Patterns, and Sounds.” – xferrecords.com

For more info: xferrecords.com

Harmony Improvisator

Improvisator

I believe melody is hardwired into human’s brains in a way different than hearing just sounds. We remember notes as they hum up and down scales. Every time I leave The Gap I end up singing whatever song was playing over and over in my head for hours. So I always say piano lessons beat a new Apogee interface for making your tunes better. I really like helper applications like Harmony Navigator or even something like Microsoft SongSmith. Harmony Improvisator is a new plug-in from Germany in the same vain. The cochleor website says videos and a demo download are coming soon. It’s Mac/PC VST for 99 EUR.

Improvisator is a programmable chorder and sequencer VST plugin which outputs chords as MIDI data or sound from an internal synthesizer. It can be controlled via MIDI input or by clicking the harmonic functions of the graphical user interface. The first thing in the process of working with Improvisator is to click chords with the mouse which you hear immediately. – www.cochleor.de

For more info: www.cochleor.de

Keywriter is a German typewriter VST for PC.

typewriter

It’s rare I do a post about a PC only plug-in because I own a Mac. I do however own VMWare Fusion and XP to run Excel and Songsmith. This morning I installed a demo version of Ableton Live inside Fusion solely to check out Keywriter. I know it’s a novelty plug-in but I couldn’t resist. Basically its a VST simulating an old German typewriter called “Erika”. It’s a freebie and you can find audio samples, screenshots and the download: here

Keywriter is a rompler that reproduce the sounds of a German typewriter «Erika». Can be used as a unusual rhythm machine, and as a tool for special effects. Main features: Full range of typewriter sounds, Stereo control; Drive contol; Low CPU usage. – http://knobster.org/

photo credit: Phil Moore

via Synthtopia

Jasuto is a modular synth for the iPhone and VST.

jatsudo


Quick Jasuto demonstration
from Jasuto on Vimeo.

James Bernard from Propellerhead Software sent me an email yesterday recommending a new iPhone (and VST) application called Jasuto. James said, “It’s like a reactable for Iphone… and it sounds KILLER.. plus if you go to his website he has a vst plug in version which is free. You can thank me later…”. Over at Jasuto.com under the demo videos someone wrote, “Impressive!! This is REALLY the future!!”. I have to say after watching the video above in full futuristic definitely comes to mind. Things go awesome at 1:25 in!

“There are several main design goals that I wanted to achieve with this.

The first goal was to make synth building fun and easy all while adding some unpredictability to the process. I’ve come up with some amazing sounds almost by accident in a lot cases that I would have never even thought of doing in a conventional synth.

The 2nd was to blur the line between patch and synth, so creating a synth should be no different (or any more difficult) than creating a patch.

The 3rd was to unify control and audio rate signals allowing everything to be a modulation or be modulated.

And finally I wanted to make sure that it was simple and efficient to add motion to a sound. So every node on the screen can record its own motion. For instance if you wanted to create a simple LFO for a chorus effect just grab the delays time constant click the record button and wiggle away. After you are done recording hit stop and it will auto-magically blend the loop points for you. All motion including the step sequencer are sync-able via triggers, more on this in the “Basics” section.

And that’s really what this is all about, it lets you explore soundscapes and make synths without even knowing it.”

Needless to say this app is sitting on my iPhone’s home screen and I’ve been glued to it. I’ll make a few videos of my own creations and post them this weekend. More importantly, I already have pieces of audio created with Jasuto I will definitely use in full songs.

For more info: www.jasuto.com

Related post: Six synthPond compositions

SM Pro Audio V-Machine Stand Alone VST Player

The SM Pro Audio V-Machine looks like a micro competitor to the Muse Research Receptor. It’s a $599 box that allows you to load a few VSTs into it and then play without a computer. If you load more than one VST in you can chain them into layers for more complex sounds. From what I read there is “control figuration” software for Windows/Mac with Linux coming soon. However, I believe the hardware box only accepts Windows VST plug-ins (am I right?). Could this be a way to get Windows VSTs playable on a Mac (other than using Bootcamp/Parallels)?

I think price is going to make or break this thing. If they can eventually get these down to $399 I can see justifying it as useful purchase. The problem is at any higher price you could just get a PC laptop. SM Pro Audio also has two more V-Machines coming out at a later date including a a Pedal type device (V-Pedal) and higher powered V-Rack rackmount version.

* External hardware host for Windows plugins (VST instruments and effects)
* Banks, presets (incl. chaining, layering, splitting) can be edited with the V-Machine or the host software
* Create synth layers and chain them with effects
* Connect nearly every MIDI-Controller to the V-Machine
* Multiple VSTi’s can be combined
* MIDI learn functions included
* All effect and synth chains can be switched latency free
* USB-Ports for copy protection dongles
* Use software samplers and stream its content from any USB drive
* sensor to adjust the display’s contrast automatically

My guess is you won’t find these advertised over at KVR (Muse Research owns KVR).

For more info: www.smproaudio.com

Using Google Trends to compare sequencers.


YouTube video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Uh6rGYiDDk

Here’s an interesting “vlog” from a guy who calls himself Hydlide. He’s from The Netherlands (as you can tell by his accent) and is a Reason freak. What I find interesting is how he uses Google Trends to compare the popularity of sequencing apps. The good stuff starts around 2:19. I think he makes an error because if he compares Reason 4 to Ableton Live. Shouldn’t he compare Reason 4 to Ableton Live 7? I put that data into Google Trends and it reads quite differently than his assumptions.

I also think it’s a bit silly of him to knock Fruity Loops as just for noobs and therefore worthless. I’ll make music by clapping my hands and humming if I have to. Hydlide also says he hates all VSTs. Huh?

I know I am picking on Hydlide a bit so I have to say he has a great YouTube channel of Reason tutorials. If you use Reason definitely head on over. I am sure you can pickup some new techniques:
www.youtube.com/user/hydlide24

You can use use Google Trends to compare search popularity of other things too. Take a look at this comparison of Depeche Mode vs MGMT: click here

Interesting no?

TC Electronic. How I use my Powercore.

TC Voice Modeler

TC Electronic was founded in 1976 in Risskov, Denmark. They are known for their ultra high end digital reverbs like the System 6000 and the Powercore platform. Back in 2000 when I was recording my album Manic Panic I was constantly running out of CPU Power on a Apple Powermac dual 500Mhz G4. Back then there were not many options. Either I use more external hardware, switch to PC or get a Powercore card.

Luckily I chose the Powercore because besides being able to work ITB (in the box) I was introduced to some amazing sounding plug-ins. In fact some of the plug-ins that came with the original Powercore PCI still hold up today. You can read a nice interview TC Electronic did with me back then by clicking here: TC Electronic interviews The Horrorist.

There is one plug-in in particular that has my heart: Voicemodeler. What’s funny is I only use 1 preset on the thing! It’s called “Male Enhancer”. I love it. I don’t use it on every song but it’s a flavor I can’t live without. I have yet to find any native plug-in that sounds the same. You can hear it on my voice on a song I did called Close to You: