Tenori-on with Analog Gear


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jGL4hSC7ek4

Novamusik hooks some Tenori’s up to a Vermona DRM-MKIII and a Doepfer A100 Mini System. I don’t love the song they create but this is the way to use Tenori-On’s! Click to 1:06 in the video to see the great action. Thanks Chuck!

“The guys of Nova Musik playing with some new toys that just came in… First thing we thought of? Can we hook these things up to the modular? The answer is yes, and much much more.” – novamusik.com

Do you want a set up like this too?

The Horrorist – We Will Get Wicked

We Will Get Wicked - The Horrorist

Here’s a clip of a new song I am working on called “We Will Get Wicked” which will end up on my next album. A man speaks to a woman letting him know his dirty plans for her. I imagine those plans take place sometime early in the morning on a weekend night.

“And it’s something we must go through.” – The Horrorist

I know this music maybe isn’t for everyone but we can all appreciate the drums of from the Vermona DRM1 MKIII firing all full force. The snare (with analog Bucket Delay full up) and clap are panned hard left and right making a sweet stereo spread. The nice synth that plays behind the breathing section is a Korg MS20 I borrowed from a friend. The MS20’s nasal filter really shines there. My favorite part of the song is when the breathing echos every 8 or 16th time they appear. I know it’s a bit Kraftwerkesque but I think it appropriately fits in a song about sex. Part of the reason they echo so nicely is that I use a TC Electronic Powercore’s Chorus/Delay plug-in. Take a listen:

Remember that music is only the soundtrack for a real life. Now go and find yourself someone to torture.

Related post: The Horrorist – Born This Way

A song about the singularity, solar power and space.

Here’s a screenshot and clip from a new song I am working on called “Into the Universe”. It’s not as dark as my usual stuff. If I can get it to a place I like it will be on my next album. The lyrics are from the point of view of a human who is half machine, sometime in the future. He tells how he used to be only organic and how he now runs on solar power and travels to other planets. The explanation is cheeky I know but that’s the magic of music because in song form I think it works.

The pads are Korg Legacy Wavestation. The vocoder is Prosoniq Orange Vocoder. The drums are Vermona DRM-1 MKIII. On my voice: TC Electronic VoiceModeler. Choir is my voice through a Digitech Talker Pedal. Bass is Linplug Albino 2

Keep in mind this is still in demo form…

Related post: Ray Kurzweil, the Singularity and the blind phone.

The price of a guilty conscience.

Have you ever bought a piece of gear or software you really didn’t need? Of course you did. Did you ever feel bad after you bought it? Did you ever feel bad before you even hit the buy now button? You knew you didn’t need it but you still went ahead. I’m guilty as charged and I know you are too.

As musicians we should be the most frugal group no? After all ASCAP isn’t much of a union in the way the Screen Actors Guild is right? We are left to fend for ourselves. No 401k plans, medical insurance or even social security. We have do put it all away by ourselves.

“My arms do things oblivious to my wishes and my orders. Buy. Buy. Buy more now!” – Soft Cell, Persuasion.

Large companies feed us adverts pandering to our wish to make great songs. However, it’s almost never the gear that’s going to make that happen. Piano lessons maybe but a new audio interface or filter plug-in… no. If you want to see gear lust in extreme effect look to the forums at Gearslutz. Threads go on miles long with people chatting about stuff they can never afford. I swear I feel dirty reading about which $1200 pre-amp sounds the best (Great River by the way!).

In truth it feels great to give in and be dirty; to purchase something I don’t really need. To open the cardboard box, remove the shiny inner plastic bags and smell new plastic and silicone. You can almost see drool in my Vermona DRM1 unboxing video. Should I be hard on myself? As an American I was raised to be a consumer. Is it my fault I have these feelings?

I’ve done well in the music business but the price of life has increased by a third in just the past 48 months. No one is paying me a third more. It’s time to put down the credit card right? Yet if I had the new Oscitron my new song could be a hit and then…

photo credit: Keegan Jones

Vermona DRM1 MKIII audio, video, review.


Vermona DRM1 MKIII – Drum Machine from wiretotheear on Vimeo.

About two weeks ago I purchased a brand new Vermona DRM1 MKIII from Schnieders Buero in Berlin. I’ve had some time to play with it and am ready to report to you. These things are in demand and back ordered. It took almost three weeks for Vermona to deliver my DRM1 to Herr Schnieder. There is a good reason why: these sound smashing!

There is nothing like the Vermona DRM1. It is a fully analog drum machine done right. The super fast attack time on the kick and snare make them snap and crack in a way that will make you say “YES THIS IS IT!”. The hi hats are so smooth, bright and shimmer without any EQ needed. The DRM1 has a real spring reverb built into it and when turned up on the clap and snare channels the clock turns back to 1980. There’s are also multiple extra drum channels for lazer zaps or toms which can be manipulated to the extreme with FM. If I had to describe it’s overall tone in one word I would say: chrome!

It uses standard midi but you can not record knob changes into your DAW. You will need to put your hands on the controls, start recording it as audio and capture your movements in real time. You can’t save presets. Thank god for that. The main point of all those knobs is to focus in on each song your doing and tune each sound, the hi hat decay level, the snap of the kick. There is a pan control for each sound and individual outputs for each channel.

Vermona DRM1 MKIII. No effects or other sounds. Pure DRM1 (320kbps mp3):

:Vermona

The unit is metal and feels very well built. Vermona is from East Germany. The reason you buy something like this is the sound.

Photos from Schneiders Buero. Berlin, Germany.

Schneiders Buero

Did you think I would go to the coolest analog synth store in the world and not take a few photos? To go along with my last post here is a photo set from Schneiders Buero. Berlin, Germany. Feel free to tag and add notes to the photos if a synth or module isn’t labeled. I dare you to even attempt to label the Doepfer Modular!

To view the full set: click here

www.flickr.com

Scanned postcards and ads from Schneiders Buero!

MFB-Synth II

Last week I took a walk to my favorite store in the world Schneiders Buero. Herr Schneider is a really cool Geschaftsfuher (store owner). When you enter his palace of new analog synthesizers for sale a Theramin greets you by sounding off as you enter the door. Scattered around the shop there are postcards and adverts from some of our favorite gear. I grabbed some of them and scanned them for you. Remember when viewing images in flickr you can click “all sizes” to see larger versions of the scans.

To view the full set: click here

www.flickr.com

Vermona DRM1 MKIII Analog Drum Machine

Vermona DRM1 MKIII

On my “must get in 2008″ list is the Vermona DRM1 MKIII. It’s one of the very few analog drum machines being manufactured new today. It sounds similar to a vintage analog machine, somewhere in-between a Roland TR-CR78 and TR-808. The tuning pots for each sound allow it to reach a wide range of sound. The new MKIII version does away with the Distortion Effect and replaces it with a Waveshaper. It does not sound like a 909 or Jomox. Take a listen:
Vermona_DRM.mp3

After the fall of the wall, the inventors from the GDR-label for electronic instruments, Vermona, founded a new company named HDB audio. Based in the east German Vogtland near the Czech border, they have been recognized throughout the years for their OEM, quality, production for well known brands of tube amplifiers, mixers, splitters and other gear. During the past ten years they have been financing their love of electronic instruments by working for these other manufacturers who respect their quality and on-time work. It wasn’t until the year 2000 that the founders could buy their label back from investors. Now they are in full throttle with HDB for pro audio and Vermona for pro synth and effects. (The stuff they truly desire to create!) – www.schneidersbuero.de

Each sound has an individual output and there is a stereo out and headphone jack. For a little extra money you can get it with silver knobs, blue LEDs and wood side panels. There’s not too much more to say other than this thing sounds really nice! In a recent trip to Schneider’s Buro in Berlin I picked up the advertisement for the DRM (MKII version). I scanned it for you to check out. If you click the image above it will take you to the full size scan.