Genre jumping can be a good strategy.

I don’t let the press pigeon hole my music career into any specific genre. I’ve created all sorts of electronic music ranging all the way from minimal to hardcore. About 90% of my music has my own vocals on it and I like to feel I have my own style whatever the tempo or loudness of the kick drum. In fact, if you’ve been making electronic dance records for more than five years it’s almost certain you also genre jumped to stay relevant. Some people think its a difficult thing to get accepted in a new group or scene but I know the trick: Make great music!

Another good reason to learn how to make a song that fits in another genre is you that become a better producer. Many genre’s rely on certain production techniques or styles. For minimal you better know how to use swing effectively. For EBM get a hardware sequencer and set it to 6 steps. You want to make Ed Banger style tracks? You better learn how to sidechain. Trance? An arpeggiator is your best friend. As time goes on you will use all these techniques together. I would go as far as saying that when new technology is released to the masses new music genres are formed around them.

So besides learning new things you also open yourself up to more people. If your only making swedish black metal your fan base will maybe only ever be 10,000. You also get to work with more producers. My latest release Gigabytes Numbers was remixed by Tony Rohr. He’s a top producer who I would have never met if I didn’t let Miro convince me to try out some minimal stuff. I want to be the band that sounds like The Horrorist.

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on May 30, 2008 at 10:15 am, filed under political, song writing and tagged , , , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.