English Tear

When I saw the new Korg MS20 Mini I should have out $600 aside for it. There was one problem though. My heart now belongs to my Eurorack modular. But wait The Harvestman has come to the rescue! Scott has announced the English Tear which is an attenuverter and Eurorack interface for the Korg. He says it will be available in April and be inexpensive. Spend. Spend more now!

“I announce with great satisfaction ENGLISH TEAR, the first in a line of small utility modules. This module features the expected “voltage processor” attenuverter and big offset knobs, but also includes a full set of functions for interfacing to an MS-20. Easy conversion from exponential volt-per-octave to linear hertz-per-volt and back, as well as V-trigger to S-trigger conversion. Jack normalling fixes the voltage processors to these converter circuits, so you may scale the input voltages as desired. The log/expo converter ciruits also have many other uses in your modular system beyond the conversion of pitched voltages.” – The Harvestman

For more info: https://www.facebook.com…6344336&type=1&theater

via Matrixsynth

Waveform City

Waveform City is an interview podcast that was started in January of this year (2012). Some of the people interviewed so far include Tom Erbe, Make Noise, WMD, Richard Divine, 4MS, Mark Verbos and The Harvestman. If you have a Eurorack addiction you may as well subscribe!

“This podcast will hopefully illuminate the world of synthesizers and the people who use them along with the people who build them and repair them.” – Waveform City

For more info: waveformcity.blogspot.com

Tyme Sefari 2

I’ve fallen in love with my little Eurorack modular system. I’ve also become quickly obsessed with finding out what all the different available modules can do. One module high on my list is the Make Noise Photogene. It’s like a sampler, looper, slicers yet with CV control. Scott Jaeger the crazy man behind the Harvestman modules also has a similar type of module and he’s about to release a new version of it called the Tyme Sefari 2. I’m not sure the exact differences between the Photogene and Tyme Sefari 2 but one or the other is coming my way this year. If you a fan of the movie THX-1138′s constant futuristic gibberish you owe it to yourself to check these modules out.

“Scott Jaeger of Harvestman posted a revised version of the sampling/destruction Tyme Sefari on his social media outlets.” – trashaudio.com

For more info: theharvestman.org and makenoisemusic.com

via trashaudio.com

Planning a Modular

I’ve started to plan a modular synthesizer. I really like the Monorocket cases and I’ve picked out some modules to start with: Doepfer A-190-3 Midi to CV interface, Doepfer A-155 Analog Sequencer, Doepfer A-198 Ribbon Controller, Livewire Audio Frequency Generator (AFG), Harvestman Hertz Donut digital oscillator, Doepfer a-118 Noise Module, Livewire FrequenSteiner Filter, Doepfer A-140 Envelope Generator (two of them), Doepfer a-147 LFO, Pittsburgh Modular Analog Delay and a Doepfer a-199 Spring Reverb.

I have some questions: Do I need to know anything about powering these? If I got the Monorocket M9B could I just plug the above in and expect it to work? Is there a shop or meet up in the NYC are where I can try out some modules? What about my choices above? For example I picked two Doepfer A-140 Envelope Generators because I have two Oscillators. I assume I need them otherwise the Oscillators will just drone on. I know there are a lot of other exciting modules out there but any recommendations are welcome.

“Combining the signals generated by multiple modules into a common audio output allows a potentially infinite number of configurations, leading to a potentially infinite number of sounds.” – Wikipedia

For more info: modularplanner.co.uk

The Harvestman Zorlon Cannon 8-bit Module.

Zorlon Cannon

Of all the modules you can buy for a modular synthesizer my favorite is the Zorlon Cannon. This nicely named module comes from “The Harvestman” based out of Michigan (USA). What separates this module, and in fact all The Harvestman modules is that they are based on vintage digital electronics not analog components. Here is the objective statement fromZorlon Cannon - panel The Harvestman website:

The development of these synthesizer modules fulfills four major personal goals:

1. To enable a voltage-controlled deployment of traditionally “digital” signal generation and processing techniques.

2. To produce a series of synthesizer modules that aid my personal compositional aesthetics: aliasing, quantization, and severe signal distortion are not traps to be avoided, but valid sonic processes to be controlled and enjoyed.

3. To raise awareness of archaic digital sound processing techniques often overlooked in the context of analog synthesizer nostalgia.

4. To aid the musical efforts of those committed to the ideals of nonlinearity, discontinuity, and quantization

The Zorlon Cannon module is a take on the Atari 8-bit machines such as the 2600 and 5200 range. The best way to get a grip on what the Zorlon sounds like is to see it in action. Take a look at this video interview with Scott Jaeger at NAMM 2008 from sonicstate.com. The Zorlon kicks in at 9:00 minutes:

photo credit: nakedintruder