PSP SpringBox

PSP Audioware are one of my favorite plug-in makers. From Poland they create my all time favorite plug-in PSP N2O which used to be called Nitro. They have just released a spring reverb emulation called SpringBox. I have an Ekdahl Moisterizer but I still have my eye on finally getting a spring in plug-in form. Let me know if you tried this and if you think it sounds like hardware. $49 until May 1 then it goes to $69.

“PSP SpringBox is an emulation of a hardware spring reverberator (VST, AAX and RTAS for Windows; AudioUnit, VST, AAX and RTAS for Mac OSX). It recreates several features typical of a spring reverb, such as a convincing “boing” on transients and a repeatable resonating musical character with an adjustable presence. A selection of configurations from two to six springs total is provided, as well as the ability to set stereo spread and pan/balance configured to suit various mix setups – from a typical guitar reverb to a creative uses as a send reverb in the mix. Thanks to PSP SpringBox’s two channel A and B settings setup and range of presets operation is fast and easy.” – pspaudioware.com

For more info: pspaudioware.com/plugins/reverbs/psp_springbox1

PSP N2O

One of my all time favorite plug-ins PSP Nitro has been replaced with an all new version. I’ve used Nitro on almost every song I’ve recorded the past few years because it has a very unique and nice sound quality. It mangled audio but also has a professional sounding sheen. The replacement called N2O was rewritten from scratch, adds new modules, extended modulation and about 200 presets. Upgrade price is $69 until Dec 31. $149 to buy it new. More videos: click here

“Up to four sound processing operators at a time; among the available types are: morphing resonant and formant filters, eq, delay, reverb, pitch-shifter, compressor/expander, bitcrusher, distortion, full-wave rectifier and many more. Up to four modulators at a time; the list includes: LFO, envelope detector, ADSR step sequencer. Built-in limiter that uses algorithms from our extremely well regarded PSP Xenon hi-definition mastering limiter. Sidechain (key) input. Expandable architecture – new operators and modulator types to be added in future versions while preserving backward compatibility. – pspaudioware.com

For more info: pspaudioware.com

PSP 85

PSP Audioware from Poland was one of the early great VST plug-in makers. One of their plug-ins Nitro is in my top 10 of all time. They have updated there very good delay plug-in the 84 up a number to 85. $39 upgrade until August 8th then it jumps to $99.

“PSP 85 successor of the PSP 84 which became the favorite delay plug-in for some of you. PSP 85 is the product of our eternal fascination with the endless possibilities offered by variable sample rate delay lines. PSP 85 benefits from aggressive algorithm optimization and adds numerous significant new features while retaining full preset and bank compatibility with our renowned PSP 84 delay. The plug-in comes with sixty wild and twisted new presets designed to highlight its exciting new attributes, in addition to a supplementary bank containing more ‘bread and butter’ PSP 84 factory programs.” – pspaudioware.com

For more info: pspaudioware.com/plugins/delays/psp_85/

PSP Audioware Nitro on sale for $10.

pspnitro

Nitro is one of my all time favorite plug-ins. It mangles audio in a high end way better than any other plug I own. To be honest if I had a $399 ready to blow I would buy Nitro instead of Komplete. It’s that great of an effect. If you’re a [k] fool go buy yourself some karma and go legit with Nitro. The deal’s at Audiomidi.com: click here

“It offers many filter types derived from analog prototypes in addition to other useful processing blocks such as phaser, bit-crusher/downsampler, waveshaper and interpolated delay blocks. These can be connected to each other using virtually any routing scheme. The advanced control signal generators are capable of modulating most of the processing parameters, making this plug-in an essential tool for sound design and experimental purposes.” – www.pspaudioware.com

More info about Nitro: www.pspaudioware.com

Spend time to make wicked transitions.

When producing a song I can spend a good 20-30 minutes working on creating a single ear tingling transition. Usually I make transitions when the song is almost finished. The reason I wait until the near end of the song’s creation is two fold. First, I like to hear the entire song from beginning to end and as I do so my brain tells me, “This is the spot where something is needed!”. Second, I use the audio of the full song’s mix to create the effect. You can here the kind of transition I am talking about at :06 seconds right before the vocal starts:

Here’s how it was done using Ableton Live:

  • I rendered one bar of the full song exactly where the transition is going to be placed.
  • I created a new Audio Track.
  • I delete the audio on all the channels where the new transition will be (cut a hole).
  • I drag my rendered clip into the arrangement on the newly created audio track and place it horizontally where I created the hole.
  • Now I play back the song. It should sound just like you have not done anything yet.
  • I experiment by loading different effect plug-ins on the new audio channel where the rendered clip sits. I try and find some heavy mangling plug-ins to really make the transition stand out.
  • I re-render the clip with effects on it. I will usually do 4 different variations.
  • I delete the plug-ins and the original plain rendered clip leaving a blank channel again.
  • I drag in each of my rendered variations one by one replacing them with each other and listening to figure out which one is the most interesting fit.
  • I also reverse each variation (in the Clip View) and listen to how that sounds.

Usually by this point I have a wicked sounding transition. In the audio sample I above I also cut and repeated the last 4 sixteenth notes and automated Ableton’s built in high pass filter to sweep down.

This process may seem like overkill but its the minor sweet effects that are the icing on a good song.