Omnichord Songwriter

Your looking at an image of an Omnichord prototype designed in 2004 that never was developed. I recently picked up a classic analog Omichord OM-84 and it really is a unique and wonderful instrument.

“I designed a ‘new’ omnichord in 2004 hoping it would be the next step forward. I was the Benelux Qchord importer then, and the Qchord hadn’t changed since its launch in the 1990′s. There were a lot of things I didn’t like about the Q, so I decided to think up a better one. I wanted an Omnichord that would suit the needs of a songwriter like myself. The Omnichord Songwriter.” – omnichords.blogspot.com

For more info: omnichords.blogspot.com/2012/03/old-plans-for…

Omnichord

Today I received my latest eBay purchase in the mail: a Suzuki Omnichord OM-84. Add a star to my hipster cred wall. Nevertheless I love the (analog) sound and playability of these instruments. There were a few variations and you can buy new digital models with MIDI called Qchords. If you have an iPad and you want some Omnichordness download the very good Polychord app (link). There’s a good blog that covers old Omnis here: omnichords.blogspot.com. Any of you Wire to the Ear readers own an Omnichord?

“The Omnichord is an electronic musical instrument, introduced in 1981 and manufactured by the Suzuki Musical Instrument Corporation. It typically features a touch plate, and buttons for major, minor, and diminished chords. The most basic method of playing the instrument is to press the chord buttons and swipe the touch plate with a finger or guitar pick in imitation of strumming a stringed instrument.” – Wikipedia

For more info: qchord.net

Icey rain and two nice synthesizer videos.

It’s some sort of ice raining today in New York so this is perfect “stay in the studio time”. If you’ve been following my life through this blog or Facebook (my profile) or Twitter (follow me) you know my studio is in a container somewhere on the Atlantic Ocean coming from Berlin. Therefore, I can only daydream, watch videos of other people’s studios. Luckily, Vimeo always has something for me to gaze at when it comes to synth gear. Here’s two videos I found this morning I think are tasty…


Patch Tutorial 1 from Elan Hickler on Vimeo.

“The envelope controlling the lowpass filter is set with high attack, decay, sustain, and release. The pitch VC to the lowpass filter is inverted but heavily attenuated. I used no resonance and the notch filter was turned all the way down.” – Elan Hickler


stop_motion_synthesizers from Alex Inglizian on Vimeo.

“671 still frames shot with Nikon D70. Sounds made with Roland Juno-60, TR-909, Omnichord, Yamaha CS-5, & hand made synth.” – cliplead.com

I’m fine making music with my Macbook Pro and Ableton Live but I can’t wait to get my fingers on some real knobs again. Which one of these videos did you like the most?

photo credit: 1Sock