monome arc4 plane

Money no object I want to build a room of arc4s and monomes.

“I’ve always loved step sequencers and I see the monome as an opportunity to address some of the grey area between the one knob per function analog step sequencer and step sequencers with memory. The idea is to increase the available note range without sacrificing precision and increase the available sequence length range, without sacrificing direct manipulation and feedback. So, when the arc came around it seemed like a useful navigational tool to manipulate a large plane of data.” – stretta

For more info: flavors.me/stretta

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on May 11, 2011 at 4:21 am, filed under hardware and tagged , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Flame Six in a Row MIDI Phrase Sequencer


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ktorFe3_1s4

Flame is a Berlin based company who manufacture’s interesting audio manipulation hardware. They are on Schönhauser Allee (my old Strasse) right near Ableton’s headquarters. I had a chance to play with their Flame Talking Synth and that piece is real joy. Basically it’s a speech synthesizer connected to a joystick and switches. Their new box has some seriously pretty yellow, green and red led glass like buttons and it fits in the Monome/Tenori-on zone. Paired with a Waldorf Blofeld above you can see how this thing can bring you into Deutsch-Amerikanische Freundschaft territory with just a few button pushes.

For more info and videos: http://www.shelaq.de/flame/start.htm

via Matrixsynth

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on September 3, 2009 at 5:50 am, filed under hardware and tagged , , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Flowers. Another pretty Monome video.


Flowers from Jan van Nuenen on Vimeo.

There is a large collection of really good looking Monome videos on Vimeo. This one is my favorite.

“Monome is a small Philadelphia-based hardware company that makes controllers for electronic music performance and new media art. Their first product, 40h, is an eight-by-eight grid of backlit buttons, which connects to a Mac or PC using a USB cable and the OpenSound Control protocol. Originally developed as an open ended performance interface for electronic music, its developers have said “The wonderful thing about this device is that it doesn’t do anything really,”.[1] As a result, developers have begun to use the monome as an interface for other types of software, from text displays to games.” – Wikipedia.org

More about the Monome: click here

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on November 18, 2008 at 5:20 am, filed under hardware, video and tagged , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



The Automaton buffer effect sequencer is available.


Automaton Overview Pt. 2 – Effects… from Audio Damage on Vimeo.

I like Ableton’s Beat Repeat plug-in , Monome hardware, the iPhone and random sequencers so how am I not going to fall in love with Audio Damage’s new plug in Automaton? It was released over the weekend for $49 and is available Mac/PC VST/AU. On Twitter, Audio Damage’s Chris Randall proclaimed this was their fastest selling plug-in to date.

“Automaton is a unique look at buffer effects, allowing you to experiment with artificial life within your DAW. With four separate effects (Stutter, Modulate, Bitcrush, and Replicate) driven by a cellular automata sequencer, Automaton is capable of adding subtle seemingly random fills and “humanizing” effects, but if you like, you can crank the sequencer up to eleven, and watch as your DAW becomes a petri dish while Automaton makes complete hay of the track you’ve inserted it to.” – Audio Damage

Check out the Automaton discussion over at KVR: click here
Follow Chris Randall on Twitter: http://twitter.com/Chris_Randall

Audio Damage: Automaton

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on September 15, 2008 at 12:11 am, filed under plug-ins and tagged , , , , , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



BeatBearing clear plastic chrome sphere sequencer.

There are many reasons why I am in love with this video: clear plastic, chrome spheres, multi-color LEDs, laser scanner and Roland TR-808 sounds. I am really happy things like this and other unique sequencers such as the Monome and Tenori-on are being produced. I’m on the verge of either building one myself of buying one.

A tangible rhythm sequencer. Ball bearings are used to trigger drum sounds. Visual feedback is displayed from underneath to indicate the current time and the state of each ball bearing.

Do you want one too?

Peter Bennetts website: click here
via Matrixsynth

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on January 14, 2008 at 2:29 am, filed under hardware, live performance and tagged , , , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.