Label Label

Here’s a quick beginner tip that may save you from loosing a sound. If your using hardware and you want to remember what patch you are using label your Ableton clip with the same patch number! Some hardware will respond to a MIDI Program change. In Ableton double click a MIDI clip to enter Clip View and in the Notes section you will see Bank, Sub-Bank and Program. That’s where you can pick and save the corresponding hardware’s patch number.

When I used DR. T’s KCS and a Roland Juno-106 I would create a sound then slightly change it, save it over 16 patch locations and then have DR. T’s cycle through each patch using Program Change messages. With different filter settings saved in each Patch the Juno sounded like a more expensive synth. Imagine old school Depeche Mode arpeggio patterns with filters opening and closing. It was a pain to set up but worth it in the end.

Happy music making.

Genre jumping can be a good strategy.

I don’t let the press pigeon hole my music career into any specific genre. I’ve created all sorts of electronic music ranging all the way from minimal to hardcore. About 90% of my music has my own vocals on it and I like to feel I have my own style whatever the tempo or loudness of the kick drum. In fact, if you’ve been making electronic dance records for more than five years it’s almost certain you also genre jumped to stay relevant. Some people think its a difficult thing to get accepted in a new group or scene but I know the trick: Make great music!

Another good reason to learn how to make a song that fits in another genre is you that become a better producer. Many genre’s rely on certain production techniques or styles. For minimal you better know how to use swing effectively. For EBM get a hardware sequencer and set it to 6 steps. You want to make Ed Banger style tracks? You better learn how to sidechain. Trance? An arpeggiator is your best friend. As time goes on you will use all these techniques together. I would go as far as saying that when new technology is released to the masses new music genres are formed around them.

So besides learning new things you also open yourself up to more people. If your only making swedish black metal your fan base will maybe only ever be 10,000. You also get to work with more producers. My latest release Gigabytes Numbers was remixed by Tony Rohr. He’s a top producer who I would have never met if I didn’t let Miro convince me to try out some minimal stuff. I want to be the band that sounds like The Horrorist.

Label your power supplies and save yourself money.

Today I decided to hook up my Digitech Talker. I took it off the shelf and realized the power supply was missing. I have a huge box of cables and adapters that goes back to the days of Scuzzy connections! So in I went diving into the past searching through countless power bricks. Then I found the one you see pictured above. Hey it’s labeled “Digitech Guitar Talker”! Hallelujah! So thats the tip of the day: Label your power bricks.

Many electronics manufacturer use OEM power supplies which means they are not labeled with the manufacturer’s name or logo.

Original equipment manufacturer, or OEM, is an ambiguous and abstruse phrase that refers to containment-based re-branding, where a company uses a component of another company in its product, or sells the product of another company under its own brand. OEM refers to the company that originally manufactured the product. – Wikipedia.org

Never use the wrong power supply or risk your drum machine or synth getting fried. By the way the Talker sounds amazing.