English Tear

When I saw the new Korg MS20 Mini I should have out $600 aside for it. There was one problem though. My heart now belongs to my Eurorack modular. But wait The Harvestman has come to the rescue! Scott has announced the English Tear which is an attenuverter and Eurorack interface for the Korg. He says it will be available in April and be inexpensive. Spend. Spend more now!

“I announce with great satisfaction ENGLISH TEAR, the first in a line of small utility modules. This module features the expected “voltage processor” attenuverter and big offset knobs, but also includes a full set of functions for interfacing to an MS-20. Easy conversion from exponential volt-per-octave to linear hertz-per-volt and back, as well as V-trigger to S-trigger conversion. Jack normalling fixes the voltage processors to these converter circuits, so you may scale the input voltages as desired. The log/expo converter ciruits also have many other uses in your modular system beyond the conversion of pitched voltages.” – The Harvestman

For more info: https://www.facebook.com…6344336&type=1&theater

via Matrixsynth

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on January 29, 2013 at 6:38 am, filed under hardware, modular, synthesizer and tagged , , , , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Vince Clarke on the MS-20

A new Analogue Monologues video has been posted by Vince. This time he takes on really one of the all time best synths the Korg MS-20. I played with a real one a few times. The last time was the band Camouflage’s in Berlin. It blew me away. It’s much more loud and raw than any MS-20 plug-in version you may have used. By the way yesterday Korg released something called Krome and a MicroKorg Xl. While those new products will be useful to some they are not MS20s. They aren’t even close.

“The Analogue Monologues is a series of mini video-documentaries made by Vince Clarke (Depeche Mode/Yazoo/Erasure). In each webisode Vince talks about one of his analogue synths and explains where the on/off switch is. This series proves, once and for all, that he really doesn’t know much about anything (a must see!).” – erasureinfo

For more info: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Korg_MS-20

via ctrl-mod.com

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on September 4, 2012 at 11:43 am, filed under synthesizer and tagged , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Chrome Synthesizers

I’m not a low rider rims kinda guy but I love chrome. Chrome plus synthesizers is just plain cool. I like the way it sounds, “Chrome synthesizers.”. Aren’t these pretty?

“Restoration, Renovation and Custom Fitting of Modern and Vintage Instruments.” – customsynth.co.uk

For more info: customsynth.co.uk

via Matrixsynth

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on September 19, 2011 at 12:52 pm, filed under hardware, synthesizer and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Synth Project MC-20

The Synth Project MC-20 is an iPad with the iMS-20 App running built into a custom Korg MS20 controller. This gets me thinking that someone should built and incredible generic iPad synth controller. Something like the Akai SynthStation 49 but you know… more awesome.

“The MC-20 Controller for the iPad has a 3 Octave Full Size Keyboard. So the size of the Case is nearly 1:1 of the original MS-20 Synthesizer. The case has a iPad Slot to let the iPad inside the Case and you don´t need any place beside the case for the iPad The normal parameters are controlled by the USB64 Midi Interface from Doepfer, via Knobs and pots like the real Hardware Synth. To handle the patch cords, i use the iPad. I think, this will be a good way, because the patch sockets of the App and the VST Instrument too, have no Midi CC´s. The Advantage is, that i can use with iPad App, the Sequencer and the Drum Machine of the App too. So i have a little so-called MS-20 Workstation” – synth-project.de

For more info: synth-project.de

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on February 12, 2011 at 10:34 am, filed under iPad, synthesizer and tagged , , , , , , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Korg iMS-20

Yay Korg. The iMS-20 is a full MS20 recreation for the iPad with some nice additions including an analog sequencer, drum machine, Kaoss Pad and SoundCloud integration. Let’s hope the knobs and connectors are as fun and easy to use as on the iElectribe.

UPDATE: It’s in the store now for $15.99. Here’s the link: click here

“A complete recreation of the legendary Korg MS-20 analog synth. Built-in 16-step analog sequencer to control the sound. Music production studio with the MS-20 mono synth, a six-part drum machine, and a mixer. Kaoss Pad function allows intuitive performance and control. Publish and share your iMS-20 songs online with the SoundCloud music distribution site. By combining a recreation of the Korg MS-20 analog synthesizer, an analog step-style sequencer, six-part drum machine, Kaoss-style performance, and a mixer to control it all, the iMS-20 will transform your iPad into one way-cool sound studio for the modern musician – and the analog enthusiast as well!” – korg.com

For more info: korg.com

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on November 8, 2010 at 5:31 am, filed under iPad, synthesizer and tagged , , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



The Horrorist – We Will Get Wicked

We Will Get Wicked - The Horrorist

Here’s a clip of a new song I am working on called “We Will Get Wicked” which will end up on my next album. A man speaks to a woman letting him know his dirty plans for her. I imagine those plans take place sometime early in the morning on a weekend night.

“And it’s something we must go through.” – The Horrorist

I know this music maybe isn’t for everyone but we can all appreciate the drums of from the Vermona DRM1 MKIII firing all full force. The snare (with analog Bucket Delay full up) and clap are panned hard left and right making a sweet stereo spread. The nice synth that plays behind the breathing section is a Korg MS20 I borrowed from a friend. The MS20′s nasal filter really shines there. My favorite part of the song is when the breathing echos every 8 or 16th time they appear. I know it’s a bit Kraftwerkesque but I think it appropriately fits in a song about sex. Part of the reason they echo so nicely is that I use a TC Electronic Powercore’s Chorus/Delay plug-in. Take a listen:

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Remember that music is only the soundtrack for a real life. Now go and find yourself someone to torture.

Related post: The Horrorist – Born This Way

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on May 2, 2009 at 1:53 pm, filed under music, song writing and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Gummi Bears Make Music.

What’s my secret to making music? I let my Gummi Bear friends do it for me! Normally they are camera shy but today they let me take photos of them recording a song. There are 10 photos and captions in total so be sure to click “Continue…” to see them all!


Red and his twin brother (also named Red) team up to add more noise into the signal chain of an Electrocomp-101 vintage analog synthesizer.

Green helps Orange change the Control Mode to Envelope 1 on an Electrocomp-101 synthesizer.
Green helps Orange change the Control Mode to Envelope 1 on an Electrocomp-101 synthesizer.


Green and Red need some inspiration before they go back to making music so they lie down for a bit on a Roland SH3 synthesizer keyboard and stare at the studio’s acoustic cloud.


Yellow and Red team up and jam on a Vermona DRM1 MKIII drum machine. Yellow changes the resonance on the snare while Red messes with the highpass filter on the lazer zap.

(more…)

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on September 11, 2008 at 11:32 pm, filed under Ableton Live, apple, hardware, song writing and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.