Angels In Jar – Wolfsheim

Put this song Angels in Jar on your cassette deck and drive somewhere fun tonight. Wolfsheim’s Markus Reinhardt and Peter Heppner were from Hamburg, Germany. This cassette was recorded in 1988.

“In January 2009 Heppner and Reinhardt splitted up due to personal differences caused by the solo activities of Heppner. Currently Reinhardt is fighting in court to get the right to continue the project Wolfsheim with a different singer.” – discogs

For more info: discogs.com/Wolfsheim-Ken-Manage…

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on August 25, 2012 at 6:21 am, filed under music and tagged , , , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Steinberg Museum

If you read this blog you would believe I’m a Ableton Live fanatic. That is true however I once loved another. After my early days with Dr. T’s KCS on Ataris and Amigas I went Mac and Cubase VST. Cubase VST was the biggest revolution in music tech that mattered to me personally. It enabled me to start recording vocals direct to hard drive. It’s the reason in 1996 I start my own record label Things to Come Records. With VST (Virtual Studio Technology) I was able to create what I thought was fairly new and unique at the time: techno electronic mixed with 80s style New Wave and EBM.

Enter the 00s and Cubase became too buggy for me to use. It got to the point I was hitting save after each change I made. I was also rendering “safety” versions of songs in case project files would stop loading. Once Ableton Live came out it was over for my friend from Hamburg. That all said, I have friends that use Cubase today and they tell me it’s more stable. I also give credit where do and Steinberg brought so many innovations to the space it’s really amazing. Most importantly I wrote mountains of music using Cubase.

Steinberg has put up an interesting website called Steinberg Museum where you can see the history of the company. There are some tasty flashbacks in the building. Screenshots, interviews and old adverts are all fun for sequencer geeks like me. Check it out now: http://museum.steinberg.net

“Come in and tour this virtual museum which documents the story of Steinberg from its beginnings in the early 1980s.” – museum.steinberg.net

Are you or were you ever a Cubase user?

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on February 7, 2010 at 6:16 am, filed under interviews, political and tagged , , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



I paid $4.92 for a small bottle of water.

I’m very good at being prepared. When I buy airline tickets I buy them way in advance and always plan my seat out. If there is no way to pick my seat online when buying a ticket I will call the airline and reserve a seat by voice. When I bought my ticket to Hamburg for this tour I logged onto KLM.com (The Royal Dutch Airline) and before hitting “confirm purchase” I chose my seat. I picked a nice bulkhead window seat toward the front of the airplane. When I printed my e-ticket reservation number it printed my seat number which was the same one I chose online. When I got to the airport I used the automated kiosks to print my boarding pass. I didn’t bother checking my seat number again because I figured I was all set. You know where my story is heading right? I get on the airplane and look at my e-ticket and surprise, I’m sitting in the last row of the entire plane in the middle seat. After sandwiching myself between to large people with giant arms already planted on my arm rests I realized this last row seat doesn’t even lean back. I don’t mind sitting upright until the person in front of me leans his seat into the furthest back position possible. Of course that’s exactly what happened just a few minutes after takeoff. I was about six inches from some guys greasy curly hair for seven hours. I knew KLM screwed me over because before the plane took off a stewardess came over and ask if I was Oliver Chesler. I said, “Yep. Why are you asking?” She said she just wanted to confirm I was on board. Huh?!

I had a short layover in The Netherlands at Schiphol airport. I was pretty thirsty to the point I was getting a headache so I bought a bottle of water. I’m my long travel delirium I didn’t flinch when the check out woman told me the water was 3.50€. To be clear that is $4.92 USD for a small bottle of water. No wonder why airlines don’t let you bring liquids over 100ml through security. What a bunch of scamming bastards. Truthfully I’m used to tour chaos and these are pretty minor pains compared to the long delays and canceled flights that could happen.

Everything got a lot more comfortable once I arrived in Hamburg. I took a free shuttle to the Marriot which like all Marriots was nice with a swimming pool, free WiFi and 24 hour room service. I had my Christmas meal alone in my room and watched some CNN. Before show time I was able to video chat with my wife and see photos of my families Lobster dinner. Are you feeling sorry for me yet?

The event was full and my show went off without a hitch. German clubs are the easiest for me to perform at. The sound systems are usually amazing and the kids are really out to party. If you scream at Germans they scream back at you.

The next morning I took a bus to Berlin and the past few days have been nice catching up with friends. I never lived in Kruezberg and my friends apartment I am babysitting is right on Paul-Lincke-Ufe next to the canal. As you can see by the photo it’s really nice. The only thing driving me a bit nuts is that fireworks are legal in Berlin and on New Year’s they all go crazy. Unfortunately for my sleep some kids around here are celebrating early.

I’m going to start making a new tune today. Traveling alone is pretty strange so I suspect I will be inspired. Wednesday I fly to Belgium for the New Year’s eve show.

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on December 29, 2008 at 7:36 am, filed under Uncategorized and tagged , , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.