Coming soon: A new music genre


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eUN20-7HQk0

I was watching videos and reading comments over at Create Digital Music concerning the beta release of Melodyne’s amazing new Direct Note Access feature. The one thing this software guarantees is we will be getting a new music genre soon. With every technological pro-audio feature jump we have seen artists create something new. Glitch and mashups are quick recent examples but something about Direct Note Access makes me think “this is major”. With enough stare at the computer screen time producers with well trained ears will be able to pull Hendrix guitar lines from a song and pair it with Kurt Cobain singing… singing “We are the World”. Ok maybe that’s not exactly possible but that’s going to be the obvious first goal with people who have the time and skill to try. I’m hoping we are going to get something even more off the wall, more new sounding. Music needs something new sounding to bring back a little shine (iTunes LP isn’t it).


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xh4hBf7JUPg

Melodyne editor is the first Celemony product to offer the revolutionary Direct Note Access technology. This makes possible what had previously been considered impossible: access to individual notes in polyphonic audio material. Correct wrong notes in a piano recording; change the chords in a guitar accompaniment after the recording is over; refashion a sample lick. Melodyne editor lets you do things of which, until now, you could only dream. – www.celemony.com

For more info: www.celemony.com

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on September 20, 2009 at 5:06 am, filed under song writing and tagged , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



I wish iTunes had tags.

There’s only one thing I want more than having my music collection “in the cloud” and that’s for Apple to allow us to Tag songs in iTunes. Why are we stuck choosing just one Genre? If I have a DJ Set I want to tag it “DJ Set” “techno” “gym” “Dave Clarke“. As of now all I can do is pick Genre -> Electronic Music.

This post is actually a question to all of you guys… am I missing something? Is there a way you are labeling your iTunes stuff that would help me? I do realize that if I have all the meta data filled out that I can find what I am looking for but my library is so large I forget things are there entirely. So if I don’t know I’m looking for Dave Clarke but I want a nice mix to play at the gym with Tags at least it would pop up.

Any ideas?

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on November 20, 2008 at 3:58 am, filed under apple and tagged , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Genre jumping can be a good strategy.

I don’t let the press pigeon hole my music career into any specific genre. I’ve created all sorts of electronic music ranging all the way from minimal to hardcore. About 90% of my music has my own vocals on it and I like to feel I have my own style whatever the tempo or loudness of the kick drum. In fact, if you’ve been making electronic dance records for more than five years it’s almost certain you also genre jumped to stay relevant. Some people think its a difficult thing to get accepted in a new group or scene but I know the trick: Make great music!

Another good reason to learn how to make a song that fits in another genre is you that become a better producer. Many genre’s rely on certain production techniques or styles. For minimal you better know how to use swing effectively. For EBM get a hardware sequencer and set it to 6 steps. You want to make Ed Banger style tracks? You better learn how to sidechain. Trance? An arpeggiator is your best friend. As time goes on you will use all these techniques together. I would go as far as saying that when new technology is released to the masses new music genres are formed around them.

So besides learning new things you also open yourself up to more people. If your only making swedish black metal your fan base will maybe only ever be 10,000. You also get to work with more producers. My latest release Gigabytes Numbers was remixed by Tony Rohr. He’s a top producer who I would have never met if I didn’t let Miro convince me to try out some minimal stuff. I want to be the band that sounds like The Horrorist.

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on May 30, 2008 at 10:15 am, filed under political, song writing and tagged , , , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.