Feedback Organ

Here we have a hand built Feedback Organ which uses feedback to create it’s sound. I use uncontrolled feedback in many of my songs. Take one of these and a Metasonix S-1000 Wretch Machine vacuum and gas-filled tube synth and you have very different kinda of synth band sound.

“Introduction to an instrument called “The Feedback Organ.” Built by J. S. Sanford, the instrument can be heard on Neptune’s recent record, “msg rcvd,” available from the record label, Northern Spy.” – Neptune

For more info: northern-spy.com/products-page/neptune-msg-rcvd

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on January 11, 2013 at 5:38 am, filed under synthesizer and tagged , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Push to Talk

Check out this hand made distortion feedback microphone with an arcade push to talk function. It’s called a Dr Moonstien. I can see this being used at many a live show around 3AM. It’s available on eBay (link).

“This is a hand built noise machine built by me. it is a push to talk mic with very cool arcade style big red button. you can mix your very overdrive mic preamp with 3 extremely nasty octave modulators. this is the ultimate noise crust mic kind of a death metal version of a vocoder can be used as a feedback machine. this is good noise machine for the person that is more into destructive tambor than clarity. great way to juice up those vocals or control feedback to do your evil bidding. runs on 9v battery has 1/4 inch audio out has regular volume knob and 3 volume knobs for the different octaves of crust. on off power toggle blue led.” – drmoonstien

For more info: ebay.com/itm/hand-built-noise-push-to-talk-noise-microphone

via Matrixsynth

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on January 9, 2013 at 9:39 am, filed under effects, hardware, live performance and tagged , , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



MIDI-Controlled Analog Feedback In Ableton Live

I use feedback often in my own productions. In fact the “bat” sounds you here on TTC-001′s track Dark Invader is me holding an SM58 microphone in front of a speaker, sampled and reversed (2.21 in the SoundCloud clip above). The DJ Techtools video shows a hot tip on how to get it all going in Ableton Live with a distortion pedal.

“When sitting in front of a DAW with limitless software possibilities, it can be easy to forget that some of the coolest sounds and effects you can make can come from external effects processors. In today’s video, Mad Zach takes us through one of his favorite hardware wirings, an external distortion pedal setup. ” – djtechtools.com

For more info: djtechtools.com/2012/05/27/create-rockstar-style…

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on June 7, 2012 at 9:12 am, filed under Ableton Live, DJ and tagged , , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



SirenAudio

Mike Sweeton has SirenAudio asked me to take a look at his products. He has three stand alone applications for Mac & PC. They are simply titled Feedback, Generative and Sampler. Mike created the apps using Max/MSP. What do you think? Have any of you tried these out?

“A folder of audio files or a single file can be used as the source of the 16 random samples. Each sample is given a random start time and can be triggered via MIDI from either a sequencer or an external device. The length, pitch, pan, and filter values can be set to randomise within specified ranges.” – sirenaudio.co.uk

For more info: sirenaudio.co.uk

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on September 1, 2011 at 9:34 am, filed under Uncategorized and tagged , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Vintage into New

Last night i picked up an Amplitude iRig from Best Buy (about $40). It wasn’t too long until I had some old gear going through any music Apps that allowed input. The photo above shows a Boss Dr. Rhythm DR-110 into the Moog Filtatron app. iRig works as advertised and I was very impressed with Filtatron. I think that Moog hired some good coders because it sounds right. I also think it was smart of them to release this on touch devices and not as a plug-in that you would have use a mouse with. This thing begs to be played with. The feedback and tape delay effects are great. I tried to plug a Shure SM58 directly into the iRig but I think I need a pre-amp to get my signal much hotter before it will be of any use.

“Simply plug the iRig interface into your mobile device, plug your instrument into the appropriate input jack, plug in your headphones, amp or powered speakers, download ‘AmpliTube FREE’ version for iPhone or for iPad, and start rocking!” – ikmultimedia.com

For more info: ikmultimedia.com/irig

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on November 21, 2010 at 6:08 am, filed under apple, drum machine, iPad and tagged , , , , , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Moog Filtatron

Moog Music is about to release an iPhone/iPad App called Filatron. It’s a Sampler with a Filter, LFO, Feedback Generator, Delay, XY Pad and Moog GUI. You can also use the mic in for live input. Like the recent Minimoog Voyager XL I have mixed feelings on this release. On one hand Moog should be applauded for moving itself somewhat into the future. On the other hand it goes against the analog purity that was Bob Moog design. I guess it’s good we can have both.

“There’s no question this could be a gateway drug to Moog’s genuine analog gear for the mass market on iOS.” – Peter Kirn, Create Digital Music

For more info on Filatron head over to Create Digital Music who has the full scoop: click here

Oh by the way here’s another leak this time via Synthtopia. A rack mount Little Phatty for $799:

“The Moog Slim Phatty is reportedly priced at $799. This is about $700 less than the Little Phatty keyboard, making it a pretty killer price for a real analog Moog synth!” – Synthtopia

For more info: moogmusic.com

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on October 12, 2010 at 3:10 am, filed under iPad, iPhone and tagged , , , , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Acoustic Feedback simulator plug-in by Softube.

Acoustic Feedback - Plug-in

Do you remember my post “Feedback as a sound source.“? I talk about how it can be useful to add feedback into your sterile digital recordings. Up until now I have had to aim my microphone at my speakers and hit record. One major thing I don’t like about doing that isiLok the chances of blowing a woofer are pretty high when using Yamaha NS10Ms. So I was really pleased to see a new plug-in called Acoustic Feedback by Softube which simulates feedback.

I wanted to try the demo today but when I got to the download page I realized it requires an iLok. This maybe a deal breaker for me because I’ve lost dongles and USB Flash Dives in the past. I’m also out of USB ports on my Macbook Pro. I don’t want to get into the whole copy protection debate. I don’t steal or pirate software. Companies have the right to use iLok or Syncrosoft if they so choose.

Release your inner beast with the first realistic guitar feedback simulator on the market. Go from moderate and subtle to rampant and wild by the twist of a knob (or two). To break new musical ground, try inputting a synthesizer, a violin, or even your mother’s grand piano. – www.softube.se

I really want to hear a drum machine and vocals run though this plug-in. Acoustic Feedback is $99 USD and is available in Native formats for VST/AU/RTAS, Mac/PC.

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on March 27, 2008 at 1:55 am, filed under plug-ins, sounds and tagged , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Feedback as a sound source.

Shure SM58 - photo

Here’s a way to get a highly unique sound. You probably won’t want to use this technique on every song you record. I guarantee when you do people will ask how you did it. Take a microphone and aim it at one of your speakers. Carefully turn up the volume. When you start to hear feedback hit record on your DAW. Move the microphone around. That’s the basics but now let’s play more. Add a distorion or reverb plug in as an insert on the microphone channel. Now we have more flavors of feedback. Using these recordings in your purely electronic songs adds some real life.

Bats - photoI have a song called from 1996 called Dark Invader. It was the first release on my record label Things to Come Records. I was searching for bat sounds but instead I did the following. I had a Shure SM-58 microphone aimed towards a large nightclub style speaker. The mic was going through a Korg SDD-2000 digital delay. I had the delay times in sync with the tempo of my song. I recorded the feedback. Lastly, in an Akai S950 sampler I reversed and cut up the feedback and stragedically placed it in the song. Here is an audio sample:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Early this year I was recording a song about Gary Ridgeway, The Green River Killer. The song is called The Grip of the Cobra. I wanted a dark feedback effect to (more…)

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on October 18, 2007 at 6:39 am, filed under plug-ins and tagged , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.