Meeblip

For the price of a plug-in you can buy a Meeblip. It’s a digital synthesizer that’s fully buildable, hackable and modifiable. It has a MIDI din and a volume knob that goes to 11. What could be the most interesting thing about the synth is who is comes from. It’s a partnership between James Grahame of Reflex Audio and Peter Kirn of Create Digital Music. Therefore, any cool hack, trick or update on the little box will surely be covered on the CDM blog. That fact alone makes me want to be part of the story. If you have a kid and you don’t mind the risk of getting him too involved in the music industry put one of these together with him this December.

“It’s a hardware box that makes noises – virtual analog synth noises, chip-sounding noises, good noises, bad noises, noises you can make into music. It’s got physical knobs and switches on it, plus a MIDI DIN in port so you can connect that keytar you bought on eBay… The MeeBlip is the creation of James Grahame, of Retro Thing and Reflex Audio fame. (He tells the full history of how it came to be.) But we’re serious about the Create Digital Music name going on there, too… At the same time, just because it’s “open source” and “hackable” doesn’t mean the MeeBlip is just for hackers. On the contrary – we wanted a synth anyone could play. With the Quick Build Kit, you can assemble the MeeBlip without a soldering iron or, really, much skill, in a matter of minutes.” – Peter Kirn

For more info: meeblip.noisepages.com

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on November 10, 2010 at 6:01 am, filed under hardware, synthesizer and tagged , , , , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Muff Wiggler Brooklyn

September 2010 Wiggler meetup from Pete Shambler on Vimeo.

Here’s a nice video from a meetup in Brooklyn of members of the Muff Wiggler forum. DIY meets modular.

“… Muff Wiggler enjoys scaring friends, family, neighbours and cats alike with bizarre and frightning electro-analog mayhem.” – muffwiggler.blogspot.com

Visit the forum: muffwiggler.com

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on September 27, 2010 at 1:21 pm, filed under circuit bending, synthesizer, video and tagged , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Electronics Enclosures

We all can’t be Robert Moog but with all the info online it’s easier than ever to give it a shot. I installed a dimmer switch in my living room recently… here’s a photo: click here

“Every useful electronics project deserves a good enclosure. Providing a proper case for your circuit can protect it from accidental spills & falls – plus give it a cool look you can proudly show off to those unfamiliar with soldering and such.” – makemagazine

For more info: blog.makezine.com/circuit_skills_electronics_enlosure

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on May 1, 2010 at 4:56 am, filed under hardware and tagged , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Bleep Labs Nebulophone

$80 built, $55 for the kit. Pre-order: click here. This is the Stylophone Twenty Ten style. At 1:20 minute in one the video above is where you realize you want this over a software plug-in!

“The Nebulophone is an Arduino based synth with a stylus keyboard. It has adjustable waveforms, a light controlled analog filter, LFO, and arpeggiator that can be clocked over IR. This is a beginner kit and does not require an Arduino programmer board.” – bleeplabs.com

For more info: bleeplabs.com

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on April 15, 2010 at 3:31 pm, filed under hardware, synthesizer and tagged , , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Car Stereo in House


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Av9gp02XF7g

I often thought to myself, “This car stereo sounds better than anything I hear in my home.”. So here’s an idea… why not put a car stereo in your home? I know the car’s acoustics is probably a large factor in its sound but could this be another way to check your mixes? In the late 80s I had an incredible Alpine system in my car. It was one of those units that the green buttons turned beige when you pressed them. Of course I had to take the faceplate with me everywhere I went and I had a “NO RADIO” sign on my window. Ah the old crime ridden yet a lot more fun NYC. Now if I can hack my bed to mechanically bounce…

“pioneer head unit with 2 clarion tweeters beatin” – subwoorferman

What do you think… good idea or just plain stupid?

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on March 5, 2010 at 6:07 am, filed under hardware and tagged , , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Andromeda MK Drum Machines


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_UyJ__BWiHA

Eric Archer creates a large number of original and hacked audio machines. You can see all his devices: click here. One of his recent creations are these mini analog drum machines. Beyond the fact that they sound good and are inexpensive I dig the last music loop he created in the video above!

“This was designed as an experiment of making the most minimal drum machine possible using analog circuitry. Beyond that goal, the design also includes a new feature, IR Sync, which allows a group of these units to all synchronize together and play at the same tempo automatically. Although the sound of one Andromeda Mk machine alone is simple, a group of them together can play more complex rhythms. The complexity of the patterns is multiplied with each additional unit that is added to the network. A maximum of 12 units can be connected in a chain. The Andromeda Mk-1 analog drum machine has a minimal sequencer with sixteen preset patterns, selectable by the red switch block. The pushbutton restarts the patterns. This feature allows you to shift the timing of the rhythm when synchronized with other Andromeda Space Rockers instruments.” – http://ericarcher.net/

For more info: http://ericarcher.net/

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on February 13, 2010 at 5:26 am, filed under hardware and tagged , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.