Studio Time with The Horrorist

Today I thought I would give you a quick look at some of my workflow. Here’s how I often start creating an EBM (Electronic Body Music) style track. I’ve started a Eurorack modular system and you can see my first two pieces in action here. I have recorded a 5V Pulse into Ableton from the Korg SyncKontrol iOS app. I loaded the click into Simpler and use MIDI to create a pattern. In this example it’s a straight 16th note. I use Ableton Live to route the 5V click out of my Motu 828 MKIII into a Doepfer Dark Time analog sequencer. The Dark Time is not in sync with my Ableton MIDI set up. The Dark Time controls an Analog Solutions Telemark (SEM clone). 8 steps of CV variation and CV filter variation loop the bassline. I also have the Dark Time send a clock out to a Korg Monotribe. On the Monotribe I have muted the drums and just have it playing some lazer zap type sounds typically where you would find a snare drum. Using MIDI I have a Vermona DRM1 MKIII playing a kick and snare. The Monotribe’s clock out goes into an Intellijel uStep which sends a 16th note clock to a Make Noise Echophone. I have a MFB-522 drum machine in sync with Ableton via MIDI playing a clap. This clap is sent into the Echophon where it’s delay shimmers in 16 synced steps because of the uStep control. I can play with the Echophon’s pitch knob for a wicked nice analog clap delay effect. Is it worth all this effort? In my opinion yes. You can’t really get a sound like this without going analog. This part would make a good verse. Because I can pitch the bassline on a MIDI keyboard the next step is to make a Chorus, maybe change the Dark Time sequence length or patter slightly, add some pads from an Ensoniq ESQ-1 and add vocals. I hope you enjoyed the peek into a world where control is everything.

“CV/Gate (an abbreviation of Control Voltage/Gate) is an analog method of controlling synthesizers, drum machines and other similar equipment with external sequencers. The Control Voltage typically controls pitch and the Gate signal controls note on/off. This method was widely used in the epoch of analog modular synthesizers, beginning in the 1960s and up to the early 1980s. It was mostly superseded by the MIDI protocol, which is more feature-rich, easier to configure reliably, and more easily supports polyphony.” – wikipedia.org/wiki/Control_voltage

For more info: thehorrorist.com

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on August 7, 2012 at 10:26 am, filed under effects, modular, synthesizer and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Doepfer Dark Time Sequencer Video

Here’s a great video showcasing the newly released Doepfer Dark Time analog sequencer. To get close to the specs you can read the operation manual here: Dark_Time_Manual.pdf. Deopfer has possibly the best resume when it comes to making analog sequencers and their new release may look simple but it has a lot of advanced features.

“The brandnew DARK TIME is a fantastic analog sequencer. It has MIDI, CV / Gate and also TRIGGER IN / OUT for vintage sequencers or rhythm machines. In my opinion, it is much more comfortable than the Korg SQ-10, which I had. The steps run not just forwards – they also can run backwards or in random. Also a great feature is the quantizer – like on the ARP sequencer. In MIDI mode, the two rows can send at two different MIDI channels.” – AnalogAudio1

Are you guys planning on getting one? Or do you already own an analog sequencer?

For more info: doepfer.de

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on January 16, 2011 at 7:22 am, filed under hardware and tagged , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Im Rhythmus Bleiben

There’s a classic Front 242 track called Im Rhythmus Bleiben in which the Belgian EBM group scream for you to stay on the rhythm. To do so properly I highly suggest an analog sequencer. Therefore check out the photo of the upcoming (late 2010) Doepfer Dark Time. Doepfer has loaded it up with features and it will run about 450 EURO. This is very high on my acquisition list.

“Dark Time is an analog sequencer that is planned in the first place as an add-on for the Dark Energy. But it may be used even in combination with other Midi, USB or CV/Gate equipment too.” – doepfer.de

For more info: doepfer.de

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on October 21, 2010 at 2:59 am, filed under hardware and tagged , , , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.