Random Deviation with Melodyne

I use Melodyne often on my own vocals. Sometimes I use it to correct pitch and other times for creative strange things. On my song I Stand with You (link) I sent my vocal to my friend Gabri Negro in Italy and he created a few harmonies of my own voice using Melodyne on specific words. He’s a classically trained musician and knew exactly where on the scale to place my “other” self. In the video above you can see Melodyne’s Random Deviation function which speeds up creating variations of original material.

“Simply copy the vocal track, insert slight deviations in pitch and timing, and place the tracks in the stereo image. And with the clever functions of Melodyne, you don’t have to move every note by hand.” – celemony

For more info: celemony.com

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on October 30, 2013 at 4:52 am, filed under plug-ins, song writing and tagged , , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Pop Vocals with Melodyne

Celemony has posted a bunch of well produced Melodyne tutorials. I do use Melodyne on a track here and there. I didn’t know I should split off consanants to help avoid artifacts. That alone was worth the view.

“In this video you will learn how to get the most out of your vocal tracks with a few editing tips and tricks in Melodyne.”

View more tutorials: youtube.com/user/celemonysoftware

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on October 7, 2011 at 3:58 pm, filed under plug-ins, song writing and tagged , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



IMSTA FESTA

I will be speaking on a panel with Peter Kirn (Create Digital Music), Micah Frank aka Kamoni (Sound Designer & Founder of Puremagnetik), and Julie Covello aka DJ Shakey (DJ, Creator & Promoter of the Warper Party, Music Collector) on Saturday, September 25 at the SAE, 1293 Broadway, 9th Floor, New York NY 10001.

The IMSTA FESTA is free and should be good fun and of great interest to anyone who reads this blog. It’s a pro-audio manufacturer get together and panel series. It’s from 11:00AM – 7:00PM. Some of the exhibitors include Ableton, Arturia, Bias, SSL, Celemony, IK Multimedia, Image Line, Native Instruments, Pianoteq, Propellerhead, Rob Papen, Steinberg and Waves.

UPDATE: Over 1,000 people are registered. Come on down!

“IMSTA FESTA, a celebration of music software is coming to the heart of New York City. The First IMSTA FESTA started in Japan where it was highly successful for technology companies, producers and hobbyists alike. IMSTA FESTA brings a collection of the top audio technology companies together in an environment where they can interact with music makers face-to-face. If you use music software you will benefit from this event in a number of ways.” – http://www.imsta.org

For more info: http://www.imsta.org

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on September 9, 2010 at 4:12 am, filed under interviews and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Coming soon: A new music genre


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eUN20-7HQk0

I was watching videos and reading comments over at Create Digital Music concerning the beta release of Melodyne’s amazing new Direct Note Access feature. The one thing this software guarantees is we will be getting a new music genre soon. With every technological pro-audio feature jump we have seen artists create something new. Glitch and mashups are quick recent examples but something about Direct Note Access makes me think “this is major”. With enough stare at the computer screen time producers with well trained ears will be able to pull Hendrix guitar lines from a song and pair it with Kurt Cobain singing… singing “We are the World”. Ok maybe that’s not exactly possible but that’s going to be the obvious first goal with people who have the time and skill to try. I’m hoping we are going to get something even more off the wall, more new sounding. Music needs something new sounding to bring back a little shine (iTunes LP isn’t it).


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xh4hBf7JUPg

Melodyne editor is the first Celemony product to offer the revolutionary Direct Note Access technology. This makes possible what had previously been considered impossible: access to individual notes in polyphonic audio material. Correct wrong notes in a piano recording; change the chords in a guitar accompaniment after the recording is over; refashion a sample lick. Melodyne editor lets you do things of which, until now, you could only dream. – www.celemony.com

For more info: www.celemony.com

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on September 20, 2009 at 5:06 am, filed under song writing and tagged , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Celemony presents Melodyne – Direct Note Access.

If your a musician of any type you should already own Melodyne and you should watch the video above. Being announced at Musikmesse this week Celemony presents “Direct Note Access“. The new feature which will be added to all versions of Melodyne allows you to now pick out and move notes inside chords!

  • Access individual notes in chords and polyphonic audio: see them, grab them, edit, mute, stretch.
  • Tonescale feature allows you to change the scale of chords by clicking in a palette of choices.
  • Play polyphonic chords using a midi keyboard in real time.
  • Imagine tuning a guitar after it was recorded!
  • Your sample library now has new abilities. Any polyphonic sample can now be reached into and altered!

This new feature will start to show up in versions of Melodyne starting in the fall. I’m personally excited by this new feature. I can also now imagine a few more years down the road being able to load up a fully completed stereo song and reaching into it and changing notes of individual sounds.

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on March 12, 2008 at 2:22 am, filed under sounds and tagged , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.