API 512c

For Xmas my brother got me an Olloclip. It’s a clip on wide angle, fisheye and macro lens for the iPhone. The results are really great. Just look at that macro shot of an API 512c micpre knob!

“The API 512c remains faithful to the circuit designs of API’s founder, Saul Walker. Fully featured and still hand assembled, the 512c carefully preserves the original sound character that made it so much a part of the early days of recording. Offering high headroom and a wide variety of inputs and input access points, it is equally at home in the commercial recording studio as it is in the home project studio.” – apiaudio.com

For more info: apiaudio.com and olloclip.com

Oliver Chesler on API

A few weeks ago I was contacted by API (Automated Processes Inc) to say a few words about my API Lunchbox, 512C mic pre and 527 compressor. There is little reason not to endorse the American company which makes my vocals sound better than any string of plug-ins. As you can tell by this blog I enjoy music tech as much as making music and in the past I’ve endorsed products from TC Electronic, D16 and Linplug Instruments. If you have been on the fence deciding which brand of high end micpre to get just grab a 512c and be done with it. You won’t regret it.

“The 512c brings my voice from somewhere low behind the speakers directly into the center of my brain.” – Oliver Chesler

Read the full article: apiaudio.com/word_400.html

Studio Upgrade

Here’s a few photos from this weeks studio upgrade. I’ve waited too long to add an API Lunchbox to my life. Within a few minutes of hooking up the 512c mic pre I was ear to ear smiling. Ableton’s routing makes things extra awesome because I can send any channel out to the Lunchbox and back with just a few clicks. The 512c also has seperate Mic and Line inputs with a toggle switch. It’s all very convenient and sounds absolutely awesome. I sent some softsynths, drum machines and iPad all quickly through the 512c and 527 compressor and back. The overal mix simply shined clearly. Once I added vocals also through the new toys and a new Shure SM7b mic everything turned into magic. Why did I wait so long?

“Founded in 1968, Automated Processes Inc. (or API) are manufacturers of high-end recording studio equipment including stand-alone preamplifier designs, equalization units and mixing consoles. They are perhaps most noted for their modular approach to equipment manufacture with their trademark lunchbox design which allows preamplifier, compressor and equalizer modules to be added to a recording studio design as budget allows. These modules include the 512c preamp, the 525 compressor, the 527 compressor, the 550a and 550b semi-parametric equalizers, and the 560 graphic equalizer.” – Wikipedia

[flickr-gallery mode=”photoset” photoset=”72157625919495446″]

For more info: apiaudio.com

API Channel Strip

I’ve used these API units in Lunchbox form and they are amazing. I once did a A/B test comparing my mic with 5 Powercore plug-ins vs a lone API 512c compressor. No matter how I tweaked things the raw 512c killed it. The new Channel Strip puts the very best API has to offer in a single rackmount unit. Expect a street price around $2700. If you do vocals and your sticking with making music for the next 10+ years it’s worth the price.

“The Channel Strip is made up of a 512c mic pre, our famous 550A EQ, the 527 Compressor and the 325 Line Driver, combining many well-known and highly coveted pieces in one package. Each processing piece can be switched in or bypassed individually and a Flip switch allows the compressor to be placed after the EQ if desired. Additionally, The Channel Strip includes an insert point, sidechain input, multiple metering locations as well as the famous API 2520/transformer combination.” – apiaudio.com

For more info: apiaudio.com