Bluejay

Is Jay Greenburg the next Mozart? It doesn’t really matter it’s amazing how music flows from some in such a way. Jay mentions he can’t turn the music off in his head and hears multiple channels at a time. Let’s hope he doesn’t go insane.

“There is a composer studying at New York’s renowned Juilliard School who some say is the greatest talent to come along in 200 years…. “We are talking about a prodigy of the level of the greatest prodigies in history when it comes to composition,” says Sam Zyman, a composer. “I am talking about the likes of Mozart, and Mendelssohn, and Saint-Sans.” – 60 Minutes

For more info: jaygreenbergmusic.com

Interview in Side-Line Magazine

I was interviewed for Industrial/EBM web portal Side-Line. If your into this type of music the forums are a great place to hang out.

“Chesler, who lives in New York, released a new album this year, “Joyless Pleasure”. You may expect the remixed version of it to be soon out as well. In between recording sessions we asked him a couple of questions…” – side-line.com

Read the full interview: side-line.com/id=47205_0_2_0_C

Wire to the Ear Interview with Frank Kvitta

Frank Kvitta is a well established german techno DJ and producer. I met Frank when I performed last summer in Spain at the Monegros Festival. He was in the same van traveling to the show from the hotel. We clicked, stayed in touch and next week we will release a monster techno EP called Electronic Pleasure. Frank knows everyone and was able to gather remixes from Ben Sims, DJ Rush, Patrick DSP, Dave the Drummer, Submerge, Alex Kvitta, Boris S, David Christop and more. To start the promotion here’s an interview to let you know a little but about who Frank is.

1. Let’s start with software. What DAW to you prefer and name three
plug-ins you can’t live without.

Hello Oliver, thank you for having me for your great blog. My favourite software for producing used to be fruity loops in the very beginning 10 years ago. After that i started using Reason for many years but i was never satisfied with the sound engine. Then i found Ableton Live and since i found it i use it the most or let´s say, only Ableton Live. I like the workflow and the functions. It´s superfast and easy to use and i can be very productive as i can just concentrate on making the beats and not concentrate how to make the beats. My Top plug ins i never want to miss anymore are the “Waves” of course, Nexus and the FM8 and some secret plug ins ;)

2. What is the oldest piece of hardware you have in your studio?

The oldest piece in my studio is my keyboard M-Audio Oxygen 8 hehe. I sold my old stuff long time ago already, as i just use digital software and some midi controllers and the Presonus digial mixer for productions.

3. When you have been working in the studio too long and you need to
take a 30 minute break what do you do?

Mostly i go outside (if it´s not too cold), have an espresso, do some phone calls, listen to different music (hip hop, rnb, 80´s) and then i go back to work. My ears need a break too, otherwise after too many hours you can´t concentrate anymore and everything sounds the same because ears get tired too.

4. Do you think DJing makes you a better producer? Do you grab loops
from records/tracks or always make your own beats?

I think without beeing a dj or performing in any other ways music, you can be a good producer too, but while you perform you have the chance to see reactions on specific sounds, breaks, melodys which inspire me again to do my next tracks. Also when you perform you have also a great feeling for music and beats which can be very usefull with producing too. It depends, sometimes i mash up loops and sample and cut things out to make new ones, sometimes i start all over and create my own sounds and loops. Really depends on which track i m doing and which style. And i have enough time for a track or not, deadlines are sometimes really tight hehe.

5. How many songs do you finish per month?

Well i can have days where i finish a whole track in about 3 hours from starting with the mainloop until the final arrangement. Sometimes it takes much longer, even days or weeks. IT depends always on the mood, creativity, ideas. If my head is full with ideas and i m in a great mood to produce i can be pretty fast. If those things are not given, thx god we can hit the save button and continue the next days.

6. If you found someone breaking into your music studio what would you
do to the person?

I would take him next to my side and show this person how much work and love and passion has been spent to create all these tracks on this computer and how hard it was to achieve a studio like this over all the years, then i would slap the shit out of him and call the police haha.

7. What is the best snack to have around while making music?

I always have a sandwhich with melted gouda cheese and a “BiFi Roll” and of course loads of drinks. I love snacks.

8. Do you think buying new gear and software helps with creativity
and/or inspiration?

Yes sure, always when i buy something new i get excited like a little kid and start playing around with the stuff and get always new ideas. I think everybody knows the feeling of getting something new and playing around with it.

9. If you were not a DJ/Producer what would be your profession?

hmmm good questions. to be honest i don´t really know. Probably still something with music. Sound engineering or selling hot dogs.

10. Tell us briefly what your master plan for world domination is in 2012.

I have many big plans for 2012. We plan enhanced music podcasts (which actually started already), alot of releases of other genres with new music partners (including you for example), expanding the bookings agency with more people, promote all of us more in the media again (videos, photos, tv) and many more which are my secrets and i can´t talk about them, otherwise this emails explodes and if you survive i have to kill you hehe…kidding…

For more info: frank-kvitta.net

IMSTA FESTA 2011

If you are in the New York City area next weekend, September 24 come to SAE on 1293 Broadway and hang out with Ableton, Propellerheads, Steinberg, Keyboard Magazine, Celemony (Melodyne), SSL, IK Multimedia and many more pro-audio companies. They set up exhibits in the classrooms and practice rooms. It’s a great chance to see and demo new (sometimes yet released/announced) products. There is also an extensive panel series. You can sit and watch a group of people chat about a number of music related topics. I will be speaking on the “The Future Tech Tools Guide: How to us new music platforms & APPs to build your business & create a better workflow.” panel. The event is free but you have to register in advance. Come say hello: imsta.org/imsta_festa.php

“IMSTA FESTA, a celebration of music technology, features exhibits from the major music technology companies on the market today as well as the highly educating Shocklee Innertainment Panel series about music, creativity and business. Come hang out with NYC’s community of musicians, producers, engineers, DJ’s, artists, managers, studio owners, coders, music students and audio tech enthusiasts. You never know who you may run into.” – imsta.org

Register today: imsta.org/imsta_festa

Wire to the Ear Interview with Fingerlab

I think the iPad makes a very good drum machine. The iElectribe, Funkbox and Tweakybeat have become essential tools in my arsenal. I have a new favorite called the DM-1 from Fingerlab. It has the two most important elements in music creation down pat. It sounds great and it’s very fun to use. I’ve been loving it so much I reached out to Fingerlab for the following interview…

1. Tell us a little about Fingerlab. Is it a one man show or a team? What city/country are you located in?

Based in Paris, France, co-founded by Aurélien Potier and Antoine Lepoutre during 2010, Fingerlab is a small group of independent workers, developers, designers and musicians. Fingerlab is born after the success of MultiPong our first App. For DM1,we have asked Jonas Eriksson (A designer from sweden) to do the graphics design, we discover him by his works on another projects as such as “76 Syntheseizer”

2. How long did it take you to create the DM1?

First Pascal Douillard work alone for half a year to create the prototype. After that, he contacted us in january 2011 in order to find some help to finish the App, the project was so exciting we couldn’t refuse !!. So it’s take approximatively 1 year to do the job.

3. Do you have a room full of vintage drum machines at the Fingerlab’s office? If yes please show us some photos!

[See above]

4. I would love to see a Random pattern generator (per drum sound). Any chance you will be adding that to the DM-1?

We have so many stuff to add in DM1, i can’t make any promises. But it’is a good idea ;)

5. I would love to see Panning (per drum channel) added to the DM1. What do you think? Can you add that for me?

Yes, we are working on it.

6. Are you working on more pro-audio music apps? If yes, can you give us a hint as to what to expect next?

Yes we do, i cant tell you more today, but stay tuned ;)

7. What are a few other iOS apps you use (from other developers)?

Game we love
-Osmos
-Spirit
-forget.me.not

Music

-Djay
-soundrop
-tweakybeat
-soundyeah
-soundythingie

0ther
-uzu

8. Where can Wire to the Ear readers connect with you on the net? Hit us with all the places to follow, spy and send you endless feature requests!

We are waiting for your request by email.

Thank you Antoine!

For more info on the DM1: fingerlab.net

Early Review and Interview

I went to College at SUNY Purchase. Today the school has “normaled” out a bit but when I went there it was mostly art students. One of the required courses was called Social Sciences in the Arts. The professor spent a good amount of time explaining there were different types of artists. The curriculum suggested that obviously an artist creates and is heavily inspired by his surrounding. It also suggested that every artist is heavily influenced by his audience. I found that to be the interesting part. I do think of who will be listening when I make music. The professor explained that even artists who are complete hermits, who never show their work in their lifetime create it hoping or knowing someday someone will discover it. Do you agree? Below are some links to an early Italian review of my album and an interview I did with French electronic music photographer/blogger Morganistik:

“Everything is taken, with expansion into the New Wave of Joy Division in the funereal “Love Sick”. Halfway between the Rock and Synth Pop is Joyless Pleasure…” – technodisco.it

Review: technodisco.it
Interview: morganistik.com

One Night at Tekserve

Last night I had the great pleasure in taking part of Tekserve’s The Future of Music V, The Craft of iPad Music-Making. First off, Tekserve is one of those NYC places. It’s a place that defines the city just like Katz Delicatessen or The Empire State Building. The fix and sell Apple products and have been doing it long before the Apple stores existed. The large store sits in the flat iron district and it’s full of people and goodies. Not only new glass and aluminum stuff but the shop is filled with vintage cameras, awesome recording gear from the 60s, computer posters from the 80s and it’s a classic Mac museum too. You can tell it’s sits on Manhattan real estate because like the city it’s always packed and the pace inside is frenetic. Numbers and being yelled, tutorials are happening and people are spending obscene amounts of money all around you. The real wonder of Tekserve is the amazing team of what I learned were close friends running the place. Paul Rechsteiner who manages the place flies around the store smiling ear to ear doing what at first seems like mingling but on closer inspection he’s micro organizing everyone like a turbo charged Roomba. I met a few of Paul’s co-workers such as Rob in the A/V dept and operating the on stage camera, Ben Casey who was doing sound who took the time to show me his Elektron Oktopad and Steve Chu who helped me figure out a hardware glitch on this very Macbook Pro I am writing to you on today. It’s a smart bunch and when Paul walked me through the huge back and basement of the store to get me coffee even the managers and CEO smiled at me. This place reeked of pure class.

Around 7:00PM the other presenters of the evening arrived. I’ve know Peter Kirn for a few months now and he brought his new Meeblip with him. I’m fascinated with the energy he puts into his blog Create Digital Music and it’s a kick to talk shop with him. During his performance He used the software Pure Data on his iPad and Midi to control his hardware Meeblip. I met Harry Allen who had a seriously long list of credentials but for the life of me the only single fact I can remember about his resume was that he was the guy who said the line, “Don’t Believe the Hype” in the samed named Public Enemy song. Steve Horelick who runs the popular Macprovideo.com tutorial site and is known for creating the theme song for the television show Reading Rainbow played two ambient pieces. Before the event there was a lot of discussion because Steve really wanted to play a longer piece. In my mind I thought oh boy ambient this is going to be lame. Not only were half the people there solely to see Steve both his live pieces were great. I usually hate that kind of music but it was more Stanley Kubrick soundtrack and hippy dippy burnt guy sounds. Joshue Ott created an iPad app called Thicket. It’s an art toy filled with as my wife put’s it “migraine inducing visuals” and sound. His performance was by far the most futuristic. The generated audio bleeping away with the wild grid lines the app puts out were really stunning when projected loud and large.

For my own performance I used TC Electronic’s Voicejam, a great 360 looper on my iPad. I used an IK Multimedia iRig adapter to bring audio from several iPhone apps into the iPad and Voicejam. I first created a beat using Tweakybeat. It’s a little drum machine app with a heavy swing and random option. Anything Tweakybeat creates could be a Berlinesque minimal track. Next I layered in some Moog Filatron. I set the Moogs analog delay simulation all the way up to feedback and then recorded a loop while I played with the delay time. It creates a sound like 500 samplers all pitching up and down. For the third layer I recorded a vocal saying “I Want Your Body” into an App called iVoxel. It’s a nice sounding vocoder app with a neat trick. There is an edit mode where you can scrub your finger across your recorded and vocoded waveform. Into Voicejam that went to but not just a simple one shot. I recorded my finger swiping across the waveform. I added some white noise toms from a synth App called NNN Mono. Just to impress the crowd I then used an app called Scanner911 and recorded some live Chicago Police department ramblings. Once all my loops were recorded I used Voicejam and put on a quick performance. The wonderful thing about this looper is it’s circular and each loops plays in time where you put your finger. So if you click around the circle at different loop locations your glitching or say time traveling between loops.

Tekserve was notified the New York Times, Rolling Stones and some other big press were at the event. There were certainly enough large still and video cameras around to believe it. On my way out Paul handed me a Tekserve bag with a 1TB portable Glyph drive in it… class operation!

It’s 7:30AM so I have to run out of here to my day job calling. Tonight I will update this post with more photos and eventually the entire video from the night will be online. Thanks to everyone who showed up!

UPDATE: I finally had a chance to upload a full photo set: click here

[flickr-gallery mode=”photoset” photoset=”72157626095110218″]

For more info: tekserve.com

The Early Days of Software Sequencers

KVR Audio has an interesting article from Chris Halaby where takes us back and shows us the very early days of software sequencers. The story is written from his point of view and I am sure the German companies would slant things differently. I also think Atari’s were rock solid and I never knew anyone who needed to keep a spare around. That said, it’s a great read and I appreciate some of the new info there. Check it out: click here

“Dave’s idea was to use the Mac to replace the dedicated hardware that people like me were using in recording sessions. In November of 1984, he bought a Macintosh, and after learning to program in a GUI environment, wrote the first version of ‘Sequencer’ (a software version of the aforementioned box) in six months. I loaned him my DSX for a couple of weeks so he could make sure that his software would be able to everything the DSX could do. In order to connect to the Mac he designed a simple MIDI interface that could be connected to the printer and modem ports (RS-422) and in a stroke of brilliance made the package narrow enough so that one could screw two separate interfaces to the ports on back of their Mac and get a total of 32 MIDI channels.” – Chris Halaby

Read: The Early Days of Software Sequencers

photo credit: Marco Raaphorst

Andrew Zuckerman: Music

Andrew Zuckerman: Music is an iPad multimedia book with interviews, photographs and portraits of 50 popular musicians. What has me interested is the theme of the interviews. Andrew asks why music is important. What makes music important to the artist. “The App is currently $4.99 and is available on in the App store: click here

“The Andrew Zuckerman: Music iPad app features dynamic portraits of over fifty musicians, from across genres, who provide their perspectives on one of the most universal and yet unexplainable art forms. It includes portraits and a short film for each contributor, as well as interviews and behind-the-scenes photography. Live text from the interviews can be organized by theme and is sharable. Musician pages link directly to the artist’s page in iTunes…” – andrewzuckerman.com

For more info: andrewzuckerman.com

The Horrorist in Partysan Magazine

To coordinate with my New Year’s Eve performance at the Landespavillon in Stuttgart, Partysan Magazine has interviewed me. You click the image above for a readable size or head over to my record label’s website for an English translation: click here

” I played one year for my Birthday. After the show I walked outside of Club Prag and some young German people were leaving and asked me to come with them. I got in their car leaving all my stuff at Prag. A few hours later I was in some other club so trashed I was asking people what they thought of my live show! Everyone in the new club was like, “Who the hell are you?”!” – Oliver Chesler (The Horrorist)

For more info: thingstocome.com