Studio Time with The Horrorist

Today I thought I would give you a quick look at some of my workflow. Here’s how I often start creating an EBM (Electronic Body Music) style track. I’ve started a Eurorack modular system and you can see my first two pieces in action here. I have recorded a 5V Pulse into Ableton from the Korg SyncKontrol iOS app. I loaded the click into Simpler and use MIDI to create a pattern. In this example it’s a straight 16th note. I use Ableton Live to route the 5V click out of my Motu 828 MKIII into a Doepfer Dark Time analog sequencer. The Dark Time is not in sync with my Ableton MIDI set up. The Dark Time controls an Analog Solutions Telemark (SEM clone). 8 steps of CV variation and CV filter variation loop the bassline. I also have the Dark Time send a clock out to a Korg Monotribe. On the Monotribe I have muted the drums and just have it playing some lazer zap type sounds typically where you would find a snare drum. Using MIDI I have a Vermona DRM1 MKIII playing a kick and snare. The Monotribe’s clock out goes into an Intellijel uStep which sends a 16th note clock to a Make Noise Echophone. I have a MFB-522 drum machine in sync with Ableton via MIDI playing a clap. This clap is sent into the Echophon where it’s delay shimmers in 16 synced steps because of the uStep control. I can play with the Echophon’s pitch knob for a wicked nice analog clap delay effect. Is it worth all this effort? In my opinion yes. You can’t really get a sound like this without going analog. This part would make a good verse. Because I can pitch the bassline on a MIDI keyboard the next step is to make a Chorus, maybe change the Dark Time sequence length or patter slightly, add some pads from an Ensoniq ESQ-1 and add vocals. I hope you enjoyed the peek into a world where control is everything.

“CV/Gate (an abbreviation of Control Voltage/Gate) is an analog method of controlling synthesizers, drum machines and other similar equipment with external sequencers. The Control Voltage typically controls pitch and the Gate signal controls note on/off. This method was widely used in the epoch of analog modular synthesizers, beginning in the 1960s and up to the early 1980s. It was mostly superseded by the MIDI protocol, which is more feature-rich, easier to configure reliably, and more easily supports polyphony.” – wikipedia.org/wiki/Control_voltage

For more info: thehorrorist.com

13 Comments

  1. I like that tune,its really nice.Speaking of EBM,have you ever been to an EBM party\festival to play?I’d really like to see that..

    Reply

    1. I haven’t played any of the really larger ones (Wave-Gotik-Treffen) but I have played and enjoyed a lot of smaller EBM/goth clubs.

      Reply

      1. Thats cool.I hope you let us know the next time youre playing at one here.

        Reply

  2. I love these “behind the scenes” types of videos. Nicely done. And very DAF too ;-)

    Reply

    1. Thanks… more to come for sure.

      Reply

  3. Nice Set Up! It’s possible to go crazy there.

    Reply

  4. How do you like the Echophone?

    Reply

    1. I love it. First the design, LED colors, knobs and all that beg it to be touched. Then it takes the idea of an analog delay… the coolest part of an analog delay (the pitching when you traditionally turn a knob) and makes it a controllable feature.

      Reply

  5. Wow… that is a LOT of SYNCing going on. Holy RingMod! But as I know/believe: Process is at least half the phun!

    Reply

  6. Great! Vintage and modern instruments, analog gear and computers, MIDI and CV…. Can’t wait to see more of this!

    Reply

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