Grateful Dad

This morning I have to take a long drive for work. I’m going to Port Jervis NY to do an Energy Audit. Port Jervis is a small town based at the Delaware River water gap. My father used to take my brother Alexander and I rafting there. He past away last November and I know as the drive and the landscape changes from buildings to trees I’m going to be thinking about him. I decided to sync some Spotify playlists of music he liked. His main music collection consisted of Classical. When he was angry he would actually whistle a certain Classical piece. It gave me and Al a head start on clearing out of his way. The other music he loved was the Grateful Dead. As a kid I looked at the skull logo and judged the band to be evil. Today I realize most of the Dead’s music is as peaceful, musical and melow as a lot of the Classical my father listened to. When I hear these songs today memories appear clear as day. Here’s a few of his favorites: Fire on the Mountain, Truckin and Casey Jones. Even if your not a fan of this type of music you owe it to yourself to give a good listen to those songs. They are as classic as Classical music itself.

“The Grateful Dead was an American rock band formed in 1965 in the San Francisco Bay Area. The band was known for its unique and eclectic style, which fused elements of rock, folk, bluegrass, blues, reggae, country, improvisational jazz, psychedelia, and space rock — and for live performances of long musical improvisation. “Their music,” writes Lenny Kaye, “touches on ground that most other groups don’t even know exists.” – Wikipedia

For more info: kittatinny.com

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on August 8, 2011 at 3:56 am, filed under music and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

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One Response to “Grateful Dad”

  1. I wrote an essay about the music of the Dead last year. They are a band that was really swamped by the culture that grew up around their live performances and their followers, but their music needs to be considered separate from the whole Deadhead culture.

    I’ll understand if anyone is all ‘TL;DR’ about this essay, but it sums up my reaction to my favorite Dead records.

    http://littlevillagemag.com/content/2010/06/08/raising-the-dead/

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