Boss DM-100

In my continual effort to make my music studio into an 80′s time machine I picked up a Boss DM-100 bucket-brigade analog delay and chorus. Similar vintage units have been used on vocals by the Stray Cats and Richard 23 of Front 242. You could spend a lot more on new tape delay pedals such as the Moog 104Z but they aren’t as noisy and sleezy. In fact, a quick forum search on the DM-100 shows this unit is quite coveted. I like that the DM-100 has the input and outputs on the front which will make it quick to get drum machines and iPads through it and back into Ableton. If your not familiar with this type of device watch the video above at 20 seconds in to be impressed. If you want to stay in the box check out Audio Damage’s DubStation or Fabfilter’s Timeless plug-ins.

“The DM-100 uses is together with the compact DM-2 Boss’s first BBD based delay. The DM-100 is also making use of the Roland FCF (Frequency Controlled Filter) to produce its delay sound. The FCF gradually rolls of higher frequencies as the delay time increases. With the mode switch the user can choose whether to use the Delay Machine as a delay or chorus. The intensity of the chorus is adjusted with a control on the back and the effect can be turned on or off with a footswitch (not supplied with the DM-100).” – bossarea.com

For more info: bossarea.com/dm100

Lots of Hardware in Action

If you make electronic music you will enjoy this video. There’s some pretty cool moments and some gear I wasn’t to familiar with such as the Evans EVD-1000 Digital Delay (1:25 in).

“Roland TR-626, Roland TR-727, Roland EF-303, RolandDG CMU-810, KORG MS-2000R, KEIO GIKEN MiniPops-7, YAMAHA EMT-1, YAMAHA ED-10, SEQUENTIAL CIRCUITS Drumtraks, Futureretro REVOLUTION, NOVATION BassStation and Talking calculator” – Caknobs

For more info: youtube.com/user/Caknobs

Studio Upgrade

Here’s a few photos from this weeks studio upgrade. I’ve waited too long to add an API Lunchbox to my life. Within a few minutes of hooking up the 512c mic pre I was ear to ear smiling. Ableton’s routing makes things extra awesome because I can send any channel out to the Lunchbox and back with just a few clicks. The 512c also has seperate Mic and Line inputs with a toggle switch. It’s all very convenient and sounds absolutely awesome. I sent some softsynths, drum machines and iPad all quickly through the 512c and 527 compressor and back. The overal mix simply shined clearly. Once I added vocals also through the new toys and a new Shure SM7b mic everything turned into magic. Why did I wait so long?

“Founded in 1968, Automated Processes Inc. (or API) are manufacturers of high-end recording studio equipment including stand-alone preamplifier designs, equalization units and mixing consoles. They are perhaps most noted for their modular approach to equipment manufacture with their trademark lunchbox design which allows preamplifier, compressor and equalizer modules to be added to a recording studio design as budget allows. These modules include the 512c preamp, the 525 compressor, the 527 compressor, the 550a and 550b semi-parametric equalizers, and the 560 graphic equalizer.” – Wikipedia

[flickr-gallery mode="photoset" photoset="72157625919495446"]

For more info: apiaudio.com

Kid Chameleon’s Mac Helmut

Kid Chameleon Intro from Phoenix 01/06/11 from Matt Loniero on Vimeo.

Here is a video of LA based Kid Chameleon (Matt Loniero) and his home brew helmet created out of an old Mac Plus. Who needs Daft Punk now? His friend Terrence Scoville pieced the headgear together.

“The helmet is the body of an old Apple computer, but the screen is replaced by an iPad, which fits in a slot that was cut into either side of the screen area. Inside, there is support for comfort.n LED patch that is reactive to sound is attached and its connections are all contained within the body of the computer and fed through the floppy disk drive out of the front.” – Matt Loniero

For more info: soundcloud.com/kidchameleon

Tom Oberheim SON OF 4 VOICE

What’s better than one Oberheim SEM analog synthesizer? Four of course. There’s usually a catch to something as great as the new Tom Oberheim Son Of 4 Voice and there is: $3500. Skip the monthly Mercedes Benz lease payment and grab one of these.

“100% discrete analog … absolutly no custom chips. SO4V can be used as a 4-voice polyphonic synth or as 4 individual synths under MIDI control. Two SO4Vs can be ganged together to create an 8-voice.” – Gearjunkies.com

For more info: tomoberheim.com

via Matrixsynth

Rockit!

I was 14 when I saw the 1984 Grammy’s and Herbie Hancock perform Rockit. It’s as fresh today as is was then. When I say fresh I mean FRESH. It wasn’t long before every suburban kid had pin-striped Lee’s and Shell Toe Adidas with fat laces (including me). Thanks to Laughing Squid for posting this and reminding me how great it was/is!

“In 1983, Hancock had a mainstream hit with the Grammy-award winning instrumental single “Rockit” from the album Future Shock. It was perhaps the first mainstream single to feature scratching, and also featured an innovative animated music video which was directed by Godley and Creme and showed several robot-like artworks by Jim Whiting. The video was a hit on MTV. The video won 5 different categories at the inaugural MTV Video Music Awards. This single ushered in a collaboration with noted bassist and producer Bill Laswell. Hancock experimented with electronic music on a string of three LPs produced by Laswell: Future Shock (1983), Sound-System (1984) and Perfect Machine (1988). Despite the success of “Rockit”, Hancock’s trio of Laswell-produced albums (particularly the latter two) are among the most critically derided of his entire career, perhaps even more so than his erstwhile pop-jazz experiments. Hancock’s level of actual contribution to these albums was also questioned, with some critics contending that the Laswell albums should have been labelled “Bill Laswell featuring Herbie Hancock”.” – Wikipedia.org

For more info: wikipedia.org/Bill_Laswell

uJam

Ujam can best be described as a web/cloud version of Microsoft Songsmith or the iPhone App LaDiDa. While most musicians I know freak out and call this type of stuff the end of the world I rather enjoy it. I created an account and just spit out a few works like hello hello checking 123 lala and chose synthpop as a style. You can hear it tracked my pitch and threw matched pitched music behind my voice:

“UJAM is a cloud-based platform that empowers everybody to easily create new music or
enhance their existing musical talent and share it with friends. Sing a tune or follow a simple step-by-step process to produce a professional-sounding , impressive piece of music.” – ujam.com

For more info: ujam.com or youtube.com/ujamvideo

Tekserve’s Future of Music V

I will be doing a live presentation of iPad music Apps on February 3, 2011 at the famous NYC Apple repair shop Tekserve. My co-host will be Peter Kirn of Create Digital Music. I already have my Apps and plan and I think if you can make it you will have a lot of fun. Tekserve has a great new A/V room and the store will be offering special discounts during the evening. 8:30 – 11:00 p.m and refreshments will be served.

“Tekserve’s “ Future of Music V ,” coming up on February 3 at their 23rd Street store, will be a night of live performance and panel discussion featuring artists using Apple’s iPad in performance and production. Oliver Chesler aka The Horrorist Co-presented with createdigitalmusic.com , Future of Music V will feature electronic and visual artists performing some of their latest works using iPad and a discussion, moderated by music journalist Harry Allen.” – vstinstrument.com

Sign up and more info: tekserve.com

photo credits: tantek and nickjeffery

Way Out Where SynthX

There is a much better video demo of the new SynthX iPad App from Way Out Ware over at Gearwire. Take a look: click here. So far I loved all the Jim Heintz creations including the timewARP 2600 and iSample. SynthX will be in the App store in mid February.

“the upcoming Way Out Ware SynthX is a radically powerful virtual analog synthesizer instrument for iPad that features perhaps the coolest interface of any soft synth we’ve ever seen.” – Gearwire.com

For more info: wayoutware.com