Sonic Charge µTonic Patternarium

Sonic Charge’s MicroTonic is one of the best software drum machines. Now you can browse patterns and drum sets on their website in the Patternarium. You can thumbs up or down patterns, save patterns and if you have MicroTonic running simply copy the pattern with a few clicks. I think it’s a pretty interesting web meets sequencer diddy!

“What you are experiencing above are computer generated patterns for µTonic created through principles of evolution. All the sounds and rhythms you are hearing are produced by algorithms running on our servers (even the names are made up by random). Think of Patternarium as a giant collaborative patch randomizer. Our servers are regularly spawning new generations of a thousand unique patterns, each one being the cross product of two other patterns picked at random. The higher votes a certain pattern receives, the more likely it is to get picked and bear offspring into the next generation. This means that you may participate and influence the outcome of Patternarium simply by voting.” – soniccharge.com/patternarium

Check out the Patternarium: soniccharge.com/patternarium

Reed Ghazala the father of circuit bending

The Sound Builders series continues with a visit to Cincinnati and Reed Ghazala. He’s got some great looking toys!

“Reed takes us into his workshop where we get a glimpse into his world of circuit bending, exploring the history and evolution of this art. Reed bends our minds by walking us through the struggles and triumphs he endured while establishing the art of circuit bending. We tinker with several of Reed’s machines, manipulating sound and opening our minds to this fascinating art form. He works on a project for Motherboard while explaining the method to this music madness, his process, his teachings, as well as the different inventions he has created over the years.” – motherboard.tv

For more episodes: motherboard.tv

Gearslutz Forum App

The best way to learn how to produce music these days is probably by asking questions and trolling through answers on forums. You will find a lot of nonsense advice but good info can be found. As far as deciding what gear to buy forums are also a good way to live the joy of purchasing through others before you drop some cash. Gearslutz is the uber forum for music tech nerds and now there’s an easy way to jump on and read a few posts while waiting online at the post office: The Gearslutz Forum App.

Download the free App: click here

Free Glitch Pack

Free Glitches Vol.01 Demo by Bronto Scorpio

Here’s a free sample pack of glitches from Dennis Harms at Bronto Scorpio Music. To download: click here

“Don’t expect pseudo analog stuff here! You get 120 weird, digital noises with this pack! These sounds are perfect for Autechre, Richard Devine, Aphex Twin like tracks, but can also add some special elements to other tracks. I designed these sounds over the last few months and thought it would be cool to share them with you. The pack contains 120 24Bit/44Khz wave files and a simple Kontakt (3.5 or higher) instrument where the samples are mapped across the keyboard. Mod- and pitchwheel do some crazy things in this instrument too!” – brontoscorpiomusic

For more info: brontoscorpiomusic.blogspot.com

photo credit: mikrosopht [deleted]

Me and my rhythm box

I know just another iPad synth demo. But this one is uber Liquid Skyesque therefore it gets a post. Every Wednesday in the middle of hardcore Left Brain thinking it’s good to get a shot of the weird. There’s no reason to be all spreadsheet for five days!

“Left Brain… Logical, Sequential. Right Brain… Random, Synthesizing” – funderstanding.com

For more info: retronyms.com/synth

Vermona Lancet

The East Germans known as vermona.com have some new hardware on the horizon. First a synthesizer called the Mono Lancet: 2x VCO (triangle, sawtooth, square / sawtooth, rectangle, noise), 24dB lowpass filter, ADSR, envelope generator (VCF, VCA, VCO), LFO (triangle, square, s/h), MIDI for 449 EURO. Next, the Kick Lancet based on the KICK channel of the DRM1 MKIII Waveshaper (sine -> square), FM, trigger inputs (switch, audio, gate), MIDI for 265 EURO. Doepfer Dark Energy and DSI Mopho you have some new friends.

“The Lancets approach for landing and finally will arrive internationally in August/September 2010.” – vermona.com

For more info: vermona.com

Lock on Target – Disintegrator

Someone posted one of my first releases on my Facebook wall so I thought I’d share it here and tell you how it was created. Amazingly this was produced in 1992 (18 years ago!). Back then you could have actually owned all the techno releases available. Disintegrator was a partnership between myself and John Selway. We both owned Roland TB-303s and you hear them both on this track. You also hear my Roland TR-909 being distorted through a small 10 channel boss mixer. The mixer was brown and plastic. I wish I could remember the model number. It looked like the mixer you found on Tascam 4 Tracks of the time albeit without the cassette. The sample “Lock on Target” was from a large silver toy guy I purchased at Toys R Us and hacked and line-out into it. We used to bring the gun live (and all the 303′s etc…!). The only other sound you hear is a little bass pattern from a Roland Juno-106. I think what makes this song still work today is the arrangement. We played live as much as we could and to this day that’s a large part of what it takes to make good music.

The video below is the B-Side called “Dark Black Ominous Clouds”. It also uses two TB-303s and Roland Juno-106. However, the rest of the sounds are samples coming out of an Akai S-950. The vocals are from a black and white movie about schizophrenia. Everything was mixed on a Mackie 1604 with some added delay from a Korg SDD-2000. There are some great photos and an article on the SDD-200 here: dancetech.com/sdd2000. Both songs were recorded at SUNY Purchase where I lived down the hall from Selway.

“The SDD-2000 Sampling Delay was one of those great early digital fx processors all the Japanese music corps churned out in the 80′s using the newly arived affordable chips the 80′s ushered in. The SDD-2000 is most famous for being used extensively by The Edge from U2 on every album from The Unforgettable Fire onward. It is still in his rack today, 20+ years later.” – dancetech.com

For more info visit Lenny Dee’s: industrialstrengthrecords.com