Sunday sounds: Sad Songs I Understand

I think Sundays will be a good time to share music playlists with you. Today is a collection of sad songs I adore. I really didn’t like this kind of music until I was in my early 30s when I really started to understand how hard life can be. I’m a happy person but if your eyes are open and you’ve lived/loved at all there’s no escaping the truth in these songs.

I remember in the 80s hearing Bruce Springsteen on the radio with songs like “Born in the USA” and thinking to myself, “Wow this is so cheesy I could never like this artist”. Fast forward two decades and I stumble onto the song “My Fathers House” and Mr. Springsteen makes me cry. Funny how that works. In fact, if you told me I would have to pay $5000 or I could never ever hear these songs again I certainly would pay.

It may surprise some people who know my own music that this is the stuff I listen to the most. The truth is I have recorded hundreds of my own songs like these albeit more synth heavy. Slowly they will start making there way onto my albums.

If this is all too sap for you don’t worry I plan on sharing more upbeat stuff too. Next week I’ll put together an Electronic Body Music playlist.

I created this playlist using Grooveshark. You can find me there at: http://listen.grooveshark.com/user/thingstocome/

If your the kind of person who shouldn’t be drinking alcohol I don’t recommend pressing play.

This entry was written by Oliver Chesler, posted on November 2, 2008 at 3:50 am, filed under music and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

timeline

One Response to “Sunday sounds: Sad Songs I Understand”

  1. robe says:

    In reading “For You,” at first it’s hard to believe that one performer could possibly have touched this many people this deeply — lifted them from depression, kept them from suicide, helped them through divorce or the death of a parent, or worse, a child. But story after story reveals just how much Springsteen’s music and his almost superhuman presence on the concert stage have penetrated people’s lives and, in as much as it is possible for music to do so, made them whole.

Leave a Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>